CLIFF’S NOTES: How & What to Eat to be a Lean (and, Pretty!) Machine!

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by ADAM (ADVANCED ATHLETICS, INC.)

Adding
lean muscle should be a priority in all fitness programs.  Muscle mass increases metabolism, and is key to losing weight and keeping it off.







NOTE: These are basic guidelines.  It is recommended that you speak to your nutritionist for in-depth information. 

CLIFF’S NOTES VERSION- EATING TO BE LEAN:
1. Eat 40/30/30
Each meal should contain the following ratio:
  • 30%-40% protein
  • 20-30% Carbohydrates
  • 25-35% fat
This
ratio allows nutrients to work together during digestion to stabilize blood
sugar. This ratio also optimal for maximum absorption of nutrients into the small intestine.
2. Eat every 3-4 hours. 
This creates stable blood sugar levels throughout the day. 
This provides your body with a steady stream of protein which is essential in creating  an anabolic (or, “muscle
building”) environment.
3. Pay attention to your proteins!
Incorporate a high-quality complete protein*
into each meal to provide the nine amino acids that are essential for adding
muscle tissue. 
*Not all protein are equal  
Complete proteins, like those found in meats, fish, chicken, eggs, soybeans,
and quinoa, are more bioavailable than incomplete proteins like those found in
most vegetables, beans and grains.
About Adam:
We’ve known Adam for over ten years. His company, Advanced Athletics, has been around for a looooooong time in the competitive and tough-to-penetrate fit-centric community of Venice Beach, CA.
Fitness professionals and enthusiasts come and go like passing clouds in the Venice fitness circuit (like me!).  However, Adam remains one of the leading names in the fitness circle. His theory and practice have grown in sophistication as well as in size.  Adam primarily works with his long-term and regular clients (many of whom are professional athletes).
To speak to Adam, specifically, schedule
a nutrition consultation
with Advanced
Athletics, or contact us with questions.

They Laughed At My Site, But When I Started to Write…

…it was well received by people smarter than they…

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: Forbes
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2011 08:05:36 -0400
To: prettypinkponies
ReplyTo: Forbes
Subject: Your comment was called out

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert


Your comment was called out!

On this post: Managing The Psychological Bias Against Creativity

 If the major deterrent to accepting “creative thinking” in the workplace is low tolerance for uncertainty, I would surmise that highly-regulated and high-risk industries have don’t evolve as quickly as others due to lack of innovation (“creativity”). Do you have any thoughts about the relationship between  regulation and innovation? Thank you for posting this article. Much appreciated. 3P


You received this email because you chose to receive alerts on Called-Out comments.

What I did to stay on point for today’s interview…

You know how champion athletes train extensively to
prepare for a competition?  Well,
that’s sorta how I prep for an interview. 
I
try to get in my “flow”.
Why do I think I’m qualified to provide you with
interview pointers?  Here’s some background:


I’ve been working since I was 15 ½ (Gold’s Gym was my
first gig), and I’ve experienced answering controversial questions confidently
with a big smile wearing a bikini and five-inch pumps on stage with girls who
are prettier, taller more “dazzling” than me, et cetera…and I’ve scored better
than they did in interviews. I landed my internship with a cold call. Between
my part-time jobs, volunteer jobs, and full-time work, I’ve probably been
interviewed and sized up by at least 25 hiring managers (and actual judges).
I
can honestly say I’m comfortable during interviews.
While the interview isn’t my weak spot, I’m aware I’ll
be speaking with big-boys (and big-girls) in first-rate companies.  These
companies are not “Mickey-Mouse” organizations; they demand a certain level of
professionalism and respect. If the person you’re interviewing with also
screens executive candidates, then they’re probably pretty good at judging
character. So, don’t B.S. them. A hiring manager isn’t going to be forgiving if
I’m less than par because I said “sorry” in a sweet voice.  These are
professionals with a job to do and my job is to make their job easier by being
prepared, honest and cooperative (unless I don’t want the job).
So,
I bring it.
If you’re a true pro, you understand what’s expected.
At the bare minimum, you must do your homework.
There’s
no such thing as being too prepared – only un
prepared.
Besides, I owe it to myself to behave like a high-level
professional and not like a rookie because that’s who I am. Also, recruiters
and managers are less forgiving about my small mistakes because I have years of
experience and they expect me to know better. And, they’re right!  Step up
or get off the plate!
How:
What’s your homework? An understanding of the
organization, its history, values and culture. And, more importantly, an
understanding of the job you’re being considered for. You might think this is
inconsequential because you’ll be learning about the company from the
recruiter, but trust me, they notice and they appreciate someone who takes
initiative. Not only that, but jumping into an organization without
understanding what the culture is like is just plain silly. 
If
your values don’t align with the people you work with, you’ll never advance in
the long run at that place.
I do my research on the person with whom I’m
interviewing as well as the company itself. I also have a checklist that I
complete before the actual interview. Within this checklist is a rating system
to gauge how much I truly want the job with the company.
This
is a two-way street afterall, and I’m interviewing companies just as much as
they’re interviewing me.
I have tons of experience and a lot of talent to offer,
and I’m not willing to settle for a something that is not a good fit. Also,
there’s no way I can single-handedly change the culture of an organization to
suit my style no matter how much passion or tenacity or drive I possess. 
I
know my weaknesses.
Knowing that a good fit is vital to my career
trajectory in the long-run, I have to first understand what I want from an
employer then be honest about whether they are willing to and have the ability
to provide these things for me. 
Keep
in mind: this is a negotiation.
If I accept the job, I’m making a commitment to do my
absolute best to provide the company with as much value as I can in the manner
by which I’m able and within the context of my formal role. By accepting a job
offer,
I’m
obligated to do what’s expected.
Not the very minimum.  Not what I can get away
with. I’m in it all the way. It’s a big deal and a formal commitment. And,
because I take what they asked of me seriously, I expect their investment in me
as well. I call this, “healthy relationship”. This reminds me of what my friend
tells his three-year old when she doesn’t want to do something she’s supposed
to,
“You
wanna be a big girl?  Then, act like a big girl.”
Mind you, I’m not always a big girl. Sometimes I get
lazy. Other times I’m tired, or immature. I find it tough to be on point 24/7. 
I like being goofy at times. And, I appreciate the different roles I have in
life. However, when the situation calls for it, I come through. I have to. Not
behaving like a ‘big girl’ during situations that call for maturity and
commitment cause major problems.  Stay on point.

(BTW, I got a second call back and booked a second
interview immediately after the first interview today.  The proof is in
the pudding. =) 

The Next Great Generation (Twitter chat)

Below is a recap of a recent Twitter Chat with TheNextGreatGeneration.com (@NextGreatGen).

Thanks, TNGG for hosting this chat regarding Gen Y and what we think about the current job market.  Below are our feedback and suggestions and the link to the original article on the TNGG’s site.

Thanks, TNGG!

3P

Link to article on TNGG

Improve Your Productivity by Scheduling Distraction-Free Time

Improve Your Productivity by Scheduling Distraction-Free Time:
Having quality time without distractions goes hand in hand with maximizing your productivity. One method which I love is the idea of scheduling in distraction-free time.


Photo credit: mag3737
The idea is to have scheduled blocks of the day which are allocated to getting away from distractions. This is similar to the pomodoro technique but less structured and with potentially larger chunks of time depending on the project. This is distraction free period of time focused on working, free of all the distractions. For example, I had a friend who regularly scheduled in “Talk to the hand!” time in their calendar.

Tips for Establishing Distraction-Free Time

Put it in your schedule. Make sure you have this down-time blocked off on your schedule. You always have something to look forward to, and it’s dedicated time to take a break and relax.
Turn off your distractions. Turn off your email reminders, close your calendar, and mute your phone. Try to get away from it as much as you can. Sometimes, I’ll even unplug my laptop and find a quiet place to work or just print off papers to review if I can.
Focus on a specific objective. Trying to do too much at one time can often introduce new potential distractions. If you can, assign one project or objective for the productive time that you’ve scheduled.
Build in time for planning instead of doing. At the beginning of the day, spend time planning what your schedule will be. Review your daily agenda, and find large pockets of time that you can block off for productive time.
Don’t forget down-time. Make time for yourself. Consider scheduling in down-time, as well, to make sure you have plenty of time to take care of all the other things. Or, just take to take a walk to clear your mind!
How do you stay productive throughout the day?

source:
http://connectedhq.com/blog/2011/09/16/improve-your-productivity-by-scheduling-distraction-free-time/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+connected-hq+%28Connected+Life%29

Hobbies that keep you relevant (images)


Embrace the robocalypse!
While you may not associate the activities below with traditional business-folk-type of activities (read:  Jack Welch doesn’t “do” web design), there are important correlations between the skills in employees employers find valuable and these not-so-typical hobbies…



1.Web Design: What competitive company doesn’t have or want an amazing website?  Online sites are the medium of communication of the future  yesterday. 
2.Blogging and Journaling: Aside from the obvious health benefits of writing in a journal (stress reducer), writing and blogging only helps improve your writing and thinking.  If you recognize the importance  of being an effective communicator and having “voice flexibility” (business format, web format, stage format, et cetera…), you would certainly find writing exercises one way to help with this…how do I know?  From my own improvement:  I already write better now than I did at 4:45am today.
3.Reading:  Specifically, our blog… (Do I need to justify this?)


essie@myprettypinkponies.com





How Facebook Posts Affect Your Job Hunt (image)

Survey question:  Have you ever rejected a candidate because of what you saw about them on a social networking site?


(survey below)


Below is part of an article published on TheAtlantic.Com

What are your thoughts?






Wharton comments on "Masculine Norms" and how they affect women’s career trajectories…


I don’t understand why professional norms are classified as either “masculine” or “feminine”. Perhaps a professional norm is sufficient without the hyper-focus on gender issues which mostly create unnecessary inflammation around examples.


‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

I Enjoy Being A Girl (Youtube clip)



(Great “special effects” towards the end…watch for it in the mirror scene.  It’s like Avatar, but more realistic)

LinkedIn Discussion: Mentors, Sponsorships, and Obsessing about the Glass Ceiling (.pdf; links)


I’m spending a lot of my time volunteering and connecting with people on LinkedIn and other websites.  I find this a rewarding use of my recent free-time (despite the extra weight I’ve gained).  Below is a recent discussion with a fellow Dress For Success volunteer on the DFS LinkedIn Group about women and mentorship.  If you have any insight, please do share.  


Thank you for visiting our blog.


3P



DFS Group-member’s response to Forbes.com article:


Corporate America only “pays” for those that have positions that are at a higher level, which to me, seems terribly unfair. We all contribute to the company’s success and since we are the right hand to the Sr. Executive that is creating the decisions, we should absolutely be mentored and have that person guide us in either how we can help them in a better way and ourselves for the future in that company. 

I CAN say I have had one or two wonderful bosses that have taken the time to mentor me the best they can, in the time small period alloted and I have asked them to. But it was not a initiative. So, I ask anyone and everyone that I work with, “What is it that I can do better, what have they done in their careers to get them where they are, etc.”

So, I would like to know how different a sponsor would be , as these people also advocated for me? Thanks so much! 



Our response to fellow DFS member:


Hi –
  I’ll look for the recent study published regarding the effects of sponsorships vs. mentorships in a professional woman’s trajectory and send it to you (or post it).**
  Unfortunately, whether anyone “pays” to facilitate these relationships or not, it’s really up to ourselves to create opportunities and become visible to the organization in which we belong.
  I, personally, have had professional mentors in my industry which happened “organically”, as well as limited experience in a mentorship formally arranged by my previous firm.  
  Obviously, there are many factors and variables that would affect the outcome of each relationship.  To me, a professional “mentor” or confidante or even an inspiring leader to observe is better than none at all.  My experience suggests that genuine bonds easily form when there is natural curiosity by the mentee, natural leadership abilities in the mentor and some common ground and chemistry between the two.  Surprisingly, some inspiration have come from those in leadership positions with whom I had very limited interaction – they led via behavior and motivation.  And, their work and character are obvious when observing their behavior and interactions with others over a long span of time.  I’ve gotten close to a few senior level professionals my industry by virtue of having worked in the same field and city for ten years.  These are informal “mentors” on whom I can rely to serve as ‘soundingboards’ for myself when I have specific questions, and they have consistently provided me with honest and good advice.  
  As with any relationship, a lot of it is trial and error.  I’ve been disappointed, betrayed and let down by professionals I’ve trusted.  No one goes to work to make ‘friends’.  
  The key is to cultivate and care for these relationships as they are precious [I still struggle with effectively demonstrating this].  It’s quite generous for others to take time to provide you with insight it has taken them years of experience to acquire.  Their time shouldn’t be taken lightly.  Furthermore, it helps when you’re naturally inquisitive about the person as opposed to framing the question as a request for specific steps to take to reach the top.  I find there is no answer to the question, “how can I reach the stars?”.  To each their own.  However, regular conversations with a trust professional in your field (not working in your office, preferably) can provide you with an extra set of eyes to your specific situation, thus allowing you to have a wider perspective before making big career decisions.
  I’m naturally curious about people.  I love reading biographies.  And, I’m the same when I meet people who I find fascinating – whether their “higher up the chain” or nowhere near a chain.


I read an excellent quote yesterday paraphrasing Cornell West’s comment.  I like it because it reminds me not to lose sight of the bigger things in life and who besides ourselves to consider:


Stop obsessing over only the glass ceiling & remember people in the basement & on the seventh floor.
(- Cornell West)

Catalyst Study Shows Sponsorship is Key to Women’s Success

NEW YORK (August 17, 2011)—For women especially, it takes more than meeting expectations to get noticed in today’s workplace. Female employees who work hard and play by the rules are often overlooked when it comes to plum assignments and big promotions. According to Sponsoring Women to Success, the latest in Catalyst’s groundbreaking series of reports on women and sponsorship, effective sponsorship is critical to accelerating a woman’s career—from getting her noticed by senior-level executives to being considered for her company’s top jobs.
Key findings of this report include:
Sponsorship matters, especially to women. “Good sponsors can supercharge a woman’s career by providing her with access to essential networks, bringing her achievements to the attention of senior-level executives, and recommending her for key assignments,” said Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst. “Effective sponsors also provide career coaching and guidance that enable protégés to make broader and more strategic contributions to their organizations.”
Previous research shows that women can be penalized for exhibiting self-promoting behavior considered acceptable in men but unappealing in women. Because good sponsors recognize and reward talented employees by speaking up on their behalf, sponsorship can help high-performing female employees subvert this double bind.
Sponsorship benefits sponsors, protégés and organizations. A protégé’s career is clearly enhanced by a good relationship with a sponsor. But sponsors benefit too—by establishing reputations as discerning leaders invested in talent sustainability, as powerful contributors to their organization’s success, by learning from employees at every level, and gaining leadership skills that can further enhance their own careers. Sponsors also reported a sense of satisfaction from actively supporting the careers of their most promising employees. Sponsorship benefits companies by creating more effective and committed teams and fostering a “pay it forward” mentality that makes employees feel valued and supported.
Senior-level executives must recognize sponsorship as a necessary component of good leadership. Executives should understand what good sponsorship entails and how to use their influence to advance high-performing employees’ careers, be vocal advocates for their protégés, and build a foundation of support that will ensure their protégés’ continued success in the organization. Executives can become sponsors by paying attention to high-performing employees at all levels of an organization, including those who may often go unnoticed.
There is no “silver bullet” for attracting the attention of a high-level sponsor. Sponsoring Women to Success reveals that sponsorship is earned. To attract sponsors, employees need to make their skills, strengths, and work known to colleagues as well as senior leaders. They must build reputations as flexible, collegial professionals who are consistently committed to their own career development.
Smart companies create environments where sponsorship thrives. Companies must explicitly and transparently communicate an expectation of sponsorship to their executives. “At Catalyst, we believe that sponsorship is something good leaders do,” noted Ms. Lang. “Companies that educate their employees about sponsorship, link it to talent management systems, and make it a hallmark of organizational strategy will reap tremendous rewards.”
Successful sponsorship is a win/win/win. Everyone wins when employees make their talents visible to executives, when executives truly invest in high-performing talent, and when companies foster an expectation and an environment in which sponsorship can flourish:
  • High-performing employees, particularly women, gain critical, career-accelerating experiences and advancement opportunities.
  • Sponsors receive valuable feedback from protégés and build reputational capital as leaders committed to building a robust pipeline of talent.
  • Organizations increase employee engagement, retention, talent development and the strength of the talent pipeline.
A companion tool to this report, Fostering Sponsorship Success Among High Performers and Leaders, offers additional information on how high-performing employees can attract sponsorship, and how senior leaders can become effective sponsors.
American Express Company and Deloitte LLP were the Executive Circle Sponsors of Sponsoring Women to Success.
ABOUT CATALYST
Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization expanding opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and more than 400 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Catalyst annually honors exemplary organizational initiatives that promote women’s advancement with the Catalyst Award.”

Additional References & Resources:
Link to:  Do You Have A Mentor/Sponsor? discussion on Linked In.
Link to:  Forbes article
Link to:  Catalyst published study:  effects of mentorship vs. sponsorship **
Link to:  Resources for Leadership article
Link to:  Center for Creative Leadership 


source:  http://www.catalyst.org/press-release/190/catalyst-study-shows-sponsorship-is-key-to-womens-success

pretty pink ponies: "Seven Lessons To Learn From A Market Downturn"

pretty pink ponies: “Seven Lessons To Learn From A Market Downturn”

TED | Ads Worth Spreading | Pink Ponies

TED | Ads Worth Spreading | Pink Ponies

‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

I don’t understand why professional norms are classified as either “masculine” or “feminine”. Perhaps a professional norm is sufficient without the hyper-focus on gender issues which mostly create unnecessary inflammation around examples.


‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

Professional Wardrobe: Creative vs. Traditional fields (images)

This post hopes to de-mystify dress codes in Creative Industries vs. Traditionally-run organizations by providing very broad and simplistic descriptions of each.  Obviously, while professionalism is tantamount in all organizations, there are differences in acceptable office wear depending on the organization.**


image 1





What defines a “creative industry”
Generally, “creative” companies in various sectors create ‘widgets’ that are unique and based on intellectual inspiration.  Creative fields include: advertising, architecture, publishing, software, art, design, fashion, film, music, games, TV, video games, etc….

“Judging from her fashion, I would imagine that Kelly sees design as the proper combination of key pieces. Take a look at these more casual ensembles, for example. Each is a much simpler silhouette with a more every day aesthetic, but there is an eye catching quality to each.” 


Since innovation is key, creative workplaces value and reward individuals who can think “outside-the-box” and create inspiration.  Usually, employees work within small teams on specific projects.  The teams are focused on successfully finishing projects in a profitable and timely fashion. 

Have you seen anything like this on the market?
Where one might find status symbols of wealth and success in traditional corporations expressed in styles that boast of heritage and a craftsmanship, (i.e. Mont Blanc pens, heirloom jewelry, Rolex watches, cuff links, boarding school affiliated insignia, Hermes scarves, Louis Vuitton luggage, etc…), in fields where human intellect and originality affect products and profit, the more esoteric the referenced aesthetic, the more value the individual is deemed to add.  Professionals dress in ways that differentiate themselves to signify their individual brand of creativity.

Interaction among team members and the exchange of ideas are encouraged. As a result, professional dress in these fields often serve as opportunities by which to display creativity, intellect and imagination (image 1).  Having a well-defined personal aesthetic becomes shorthand for brilliance and originality.  What new idea can this person bring to the group?  


The creative individual’s personal “brand” is the value they add to their organization, thus, they wear their brand proudly on their sleeve.


Uzo of Nars Cosmetics dictating her own brand of professional-wear.  She is a recognized for the originality she contributes to her field.  She is paid to think outside the box.  Her individuality and creative discoveries inspire others in her field.

Established business models:
Traditional corporate environments emphasize the organization’s vision, and each employee’s objective is to execute orders given from the top of the chain.  There is less importance placed on a person’s uniqueness. If you’re not in position to command orders, you’re not being paid to come up with ideas.  Ideas and best practices are provided to you. 

In other words, each group or functional division operates as one unit (read: everyone dresses alike) carrying out tasks outlined by the head of their departments.  A blueprint for how things are done most effectively is in place and provides guidelines for the most efficient way tasks should be carried out.

The focus is on the organization as a whole and the objective is to carry-out processes vital for the organization’s life.  Innovative ideas are provided by the organization’s leaders whose experience and expertise provide the group with the best direction to take.  Leadership in these organizations are paid to figure things out and make decisions;
others are paid to carry them out.  


“Separately, we are organized, results-driven and efficient.  Together, we are a well-functioning machine that will ensure your day-to-day operations are run effectively.”
These environments function well when individuals are consistent, predictable and view themselves as part of the whole. In other words, bold and “outside-the-box” thinking and clothing distract and disrupt the efficiency of a functioning streamlined process.  Imagine how disruptive it would be if we introduced a blood cell with fabulously glittered fuschia hotpants and the latest chloe jacket to a group of uniformly efficient red blood cells delivering blood to an organism’s heart.  In other words, shocking your team with your originality may debilitate the team’s ability to function and affect the livelihood of the organization as a whole.

“Our business unit has a process in place that can produce those widgets in half the time.  We, as a unit, are important to the organization’s bottom line.”
Each individual piece must fit well and operate under the same cadence to make the machine run smoothly.


“Hi, everyone.  I look just like my teammates in my collared, button-up shirt, and neutral-colored palette.  Also, this practical handbag carries useful tools making me a productive member of the organization.”


The corporate palette is simple:  grays, black and navy suits.  From topical view, groups are seen as one.  Again, the culture emphasizes efficiency, order and respect for an established blueprint.  There is a defined uniform.


“Give me an assignment, and you can consider it done.  I have a Navy Seals background and my goal is to help carry our team forward.”

While I make broad generalizations to illustrate my points, each office has its own culture and a smart job candidate will observe his/her surroundings to gain an understanding of culture.  Until then, prevent being a distraction by erring on the traditional side and observe people to understand what is generally acceptable in your new office environment.

Any healthy and productive organization will incorporate elements of each “type” in varying degrees depending on short-term and long-term goals.


CONCLUSION:

Whether and how individuality is expressed will depend on your field, company and immediate team.  Some professional environments invite individual taste to encourage exchange of ideas between team-members.  More established companies with operations in place will demand new employees to work according to their guidelines.  In both cases, the goal is to be professional, respectful and appropriately dressed.  Observation of one’s surroundings is the best way to tell what is considered acceptable in your new environment.

image 1

(**note: representations of “styles” in the above images are in sterile and generic form to illustrate points more clearly.  We understand this is not necessarily an accurate representation of groups as wholes.  Again, images are for demonstrative purposes only. Thanks.)

Source(s):
Imaginization:  The Art of Creative Management (business models)
Kelly Wearstler article by the NY Post

Harper Bazaar’s How to Dress for Success article

 

 

 

Put your best foot forward…make big strides!


our [evolving] mission

Being a girl in this city (L.A.) and “making it” as a professional while keeping up with fashion, friends, family, style, relationships, fitness, reading and everything else is nearly impossible.  We could always benefit from more support from our friends, families, network and other resources within our reach.  


It’s our mission to provide readers insight by posting about lessons we’ve learned and the lessons we continue to learn.


The content we post is for anyone who could use some food for thought especially the young woman “standing in brand new designer shoes” weary to step forward.  We hope you’ll find value in stories shared by others who were in similar shoes…as pretty as the pair on your very own feet.  Walking tall and pretty in high-heels after stumbling isn’t easy.  It helps to know others who have been there, recovered and what they do keep “balanced” in their tall heels.

Thanks for visiting and we encourage your feedback and comments on how you manage to balance your life during your trajectory to success.  Take a nice deep breath.  Then, put your best foot forward and make big strides!!!  

Yours,


Pretty Pink Ponies (“3P”)




Pretty Pink Professional: Interview w. Prime-time TV Makeup Artist (images)



Have you ever thought about being a beauty consultant in the entertainment industry?  We interviewed the Dept. Head of Make-up for some of the biggest shows on television to gain insight on how to reach the stars in Hollywood.



3P: What was your first entry-level job in your field and how did you get it?

My first film [project as a make-up artist] out of Joe Blasco Make up school was “Galaxina”:  a very low budget feature that reaped great rewards especially professional experience.


3P: What is one thing you now know that you wish you knew about your industry when you first started?
Never date Actors.
3P: Who is one person who changed your professional life for the better?
The late Dixie Carter (actor) was an influential person to me.  It was an honor to be in her presence.  She provided me with knowledge and tools that were useful beyond my career….
   
She demanded excellence and I was committed to producing consistently excellent results for her as I am now.
3P: What words of wisdom do you find most valuable?
Keep personal life personal. Work is work.
3P: What is one mistake you made along the way and what did you learn from it?
Not getting my cosmetology licenses sooner.  Education is important if you want to continue to stay relevant and competitive. 
Although I learned a lot through experience and hands-on application, I eventually got my Esthetician’s licenses (after working on “Will & Grace” for eight seasons!), and it has provided my professional practice with even greater rewards.

3P: What is the best part of your job?
Aside from working alongside the most beautiful and talented people in the world, the best part of my job is getting paid to do something I’m passionate about. 
All work should be done with passion.  Passion produces consistently excellent results!

3P: What do you look for when hiring someone? 
I love those with excellent work ethic and who take initiative.
It’s helpful when a teammate does what is needed on his or her own accord without waiting for direction. 
I appreciate working around creative people because of their intuition to help when help is needed.


3P: What advice would you give to a 20-something with similar aspirations?
     
1.  Before putting all your investment in a career in entertainment do your research!  


Learn about the industry as a whole (producers, actors, culture, etc…).
2.  Get your degrees and licenses as soon as possible.  
3.    Be realistic about how much you’ll make.  There are very few people in creative fields in highly competitive and oversaturated fields who can make a living from their craft alone. 
 Be prepared for the ups and downs, lack of job security, long hiatuses, strikes, etc…
4.  Educate yourself on personal finance, budgeting and saving for retirement.  
5.  Continue learning.  When you think you’re the best, it usually means you have a lot to go.

farah@myprettypinkponies.com

Patty is also the founder of APB Networking.  Patty and her team are award winning and Emmy-nominated hair and make-up artists dedicated to providing a solid network to others.  They promote ethics, collaboration and the highest professional standards.

Thanks, Patty and APB!

3P

Support anti-hoarding/Support our book drive!!

Join our google group and show your support!
(We want to help others “shed their stuff”!)







site:  groups.google.com/group/3Pnetwork

email:  3Pnetwork@groups.google.com

Do you make a great first impression?


(Note:  If you are not interested in being likeable, please stop reading)

Forget about eye-contact and firm handshakes, here are three ways to make a lasting impression…

related articles:
10 ways to make more time for yourself” by chronicbabe.com
“Nice girl = Bad Networker” (Thanks to Connected Life)

Wisdom learned from the birthday girl! (Nancy Hovde)

Learn to Live, Age Joyfully
Happiness is good for your health—so how do you keep a positive self image even as you age?


AAbout this post: Nancy Hovde is a life coach, author and blogger at UberEmpowermentBlog.com.  She lives in Redondo Beach and I’ve known her for almost ten years.  I admire her life-juggling abilities – her discipline, work ethic, positive attitude and resilience.  Happy birthday, Nancy.




I was searching for the perfect birthday card for my 93-year-old grandma at Card De A in Redondo Beach, and it reminded me of what’s become an annual tradition. Each year I ask her what words of wisdom she acquired from the year before. This year, the focus was on maintaining her level of happiness through humor. She makes fun of her memory lapses.
Her inner strength takes my breath away, especially when I notice her small, frail frame. I’m grateful that my loving and supportive parents surround her. Optimism, laughter, being around supportive family members and positive emotions can counteract many harmful effects at any age, especially in our sixties, seventies, eighties and beyond.

We don’t need to wait until we reach a certain age to acquire wisdom and humor; even as we age, we can begin to practice what can help us develop an optimistic outlook on life. Aside from eating right and exercising, it is awareness and knowledge of life experiences, changes in our expectations of life and remembering our sense of humor that contributes to aging gracefully and joyfully.
Many of us would speculate that positive emotions may directly affect health by altering the chemical balance of the body. We can start today, and as we age, we can learn to live more in the moment, appreciate life and experience a sense of satisfaction and well being. Our ability to maintain happiness and peace of mind depends on our attitude.


Here are some tips you can begin using today to ensure a positive attitude about life and aging:


Listen carefully to yourself. 
If you have put yourself down for as long as you can remember—perhaps even since childhood—a lifetime of negative subliminal messages can take their toll by turning you into a pessimist. I encourage you to try to spend one to three days writing down the phrases you use in your “self talk.” Chances are you will find that you repeat several phrases over and over again that reinforce your negative image of yourself. Once you are aware of these phrases, you can change them.
If an issue is not resolved, it will continue to fester—you will relive the negative emotions tied to that issue over and over again. 

Write about what you feel in your journal for about 15 minutes a day for three days. 
Once you begin to write, don’t stop until the time is up. This exercise will help you organize your thoughts and get negative ones out of your system. Notice how much better you feel about yourself at the end of three days.

Seek out new opportunities. 
Discover new challenges each month. You can feel optimistic when you always have a goal to achieve that’s just over the horizon. When you begin to get close to reaching that goal, set a new one. This allows you to keep moving consistently ahead.
Keep fun in your life by eliminating monotony, a sure killer of optimism. Try to do one new thing every week or month. Try a new coffee shop or restaurant, visit a museum, try a new activity or sport, or go to a book signing, lecture or community event. A friend and I enjoyed dinner at Turquoise in Redondo Beach. This was her first time eating there. It was fun to see her enthusiasm and delight when she discovered a new Turquoise in Redondo Beach. This was her first time eating there. It was fun to see her enthusiasm and delight when she discovered a new favorite restaurant.

Look for a new wonder of nature each day. 
I marvel each time I am on Portuguese Bend Trail and see the views of Palos Verdes. It’s a tranquil escape.

Learn to laugh at yourself. 
Yes, sad events and situations will come up in life, so allow yourself to experience grief—just don’t let it control you. Lend a hand to someone worse off than yourself by volunteering at a hospital or visiting a shelter. Try meditating for five minutes each day. During that time, 

Make a mental list of at least three great things that happened to you that day.
Simply recalling one episode of anger can depress the immune system; however, remembering a time when you compassionate or caring can enhance your immune system. So laugh a lot! You’ll heal your body and your mind—and feel joyful at any age.

Closet Essentials – what do you wear when you work from home? (images)


I.  BEING PUT-TOGETHER AT HOME


I miss writing about office-wear.  


I miss wearing office-wear.


If this is your first visit to 3P, I’ll prepare you for what some have called my “vain” side.  I’m into wardrobe, shopping and trying to look my best (call me a “girl”).  That said, even when I’m at home, I’m somehow more productive when I’ve taken the time to “put myself together.  Continuing to “dress for the day” helps keep my priorities in a professional context.  Being dressed for business tasks makes sure the television, web, and phone calls don’t distract me from what I need to do that day.


 Since my current priorities mostly involve conversations between recruiters and HR people online and by phone, I have to feel comfortable and at ease, without feeling so relaxed I lose my professional sensibility.  In other words, bunny slippers are not part of my working-from-home wardrobe.  Do you feel like a superstar right when you roll out of bed?


II.  STAYING INDOORS

If truly staying indoors, I love wearing soft cotton shirts and pants with that fit well (not just your ol’ one-size-fits all sweatshirt).  Monrow brand makes fabulous vintage sweatpants and soft cotton tees that are tailored to fit a young woman’s frame properly.  J.Crew is another good place to buy basics (during sales, of course).  Although the silhouettes I describe are loose-fitting or relaxed-fitting, they are lounge-wear and not sleep-wear.  Pajamas all day are not allowed off-campus past sophomore year.

Soft, light cotton henleys, tees, tanks are definite ‘musts’.  The weather in L.A. quickly changes from scorching hot, to rain, to fog in a matter of minutes.  Lighter pieces are ideal here because they can be layered easily without adding bulk to your figure.
Dresses are also great for their ease of wear.  Dresses allow for efficient ‘wardrobe-styling’.  If you have a comfy jersey dress, it cuts your outfit-hunting time in half!
III.  RUNNING ERRANDS
When I have to run errands, I like to dress comfortably but, slightly more dressed up than what I consider lounge-wear.  I prefer the casual version (or “weekend version“) of office-wear (you never know if you’ll run into your future boss).  What I mean is, I wear less tailored versions of button-up dress shirts, or loose-fitting cardigans with denim.  I still wear loafers (mocs) and not flip-flops if I can help it.
What I described is a good balance between being put-together, comfortable, and mature (professional).  If I run into potential employers, former colleagues or anyone in my professional network, I’d feel confident that I have represented myself in good form even outside of a business setting.  At the same time, if I run into my friends, I could join them for lunch without having to change out of the  khaki/polo combo or any other outfits that are not appropriate for my age and personality…
CONCLUSION:  PREPARATION IS KEY!
It’s important to be put-together if you want to be productive.  There’s something about looking mature that makes one behave more responsibly (for most people).  If your goal isn’t to sit around like a vegetable on the couch and if you’d like to prevent yourself from falling into a lazy unproductive lull, mentally prepare yourself by dressing, then behaving like the energetic and responsible go-getter that you are!!!  Even Kobe has to warm up before games…
What do you wear on the weekends?  Do you present yourself as a mature and capable individual?

(the other “closet essentials” post)…

Interview Suit (image)

Interview Suit

simple.  classic.  no loud jewelry.  don’t forget your stockings.

Interview Suit by prettypinkponies featuring mary jane high heels

Tall Boots 2011 (37 photos)