“How to build an innovation factory”

“How to build an innovation factory”

Great article in downloadable (.pdf) format from Stanford.edu about how to “…systemize innovation…” (Hargadon & Sutton).

The article makes suggestions about how organizations can benefit from a constant flow of new ideas by implementing and efficient “idea-generating process”. 

I agree that brilliant ideas are worthless if one cannot implement them to benefit anybody. An individual’s genius is irrelevant without the strong collaboration of those who can help implement it and translate it into a valuable commodity to benefit others.

All the best, 

Meg

 

Bios:

Andrew Hargadon is an assistant professor of organizational behavior at the Warrington College of Business Administration at tbe University of Florida, v/here he studies and teaches technology management Robert I. Sutton

is a professor in Stanford’s Department of Management Science and Engineering, where he is also codirector of the
Center for Work, Technology, and Organization. He is the coauthor, with feffrey Pfeffer, of The Knowing-Dwing Gap:
How Smart Companies Turn Knowledge into Action, published by Harvard Business School Press in 1999.

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Jean Paul Gaultier’s New Coke Bottle Revealed!

Despite Coca-Cola’s several collaborations with designers and artists to produce fresh bottle images, it’s preeminent brand signature — the shape of its bottle — is never out shined.

Jean Paul Gaultier’s New Coke Bottle Revealed!.

Bridget Hoida on: Sunglass Burial

I’ve always been a little bit, shall we say, irrational, devoted when it comes to my Sunnies. Like certain women from Texas who have a thing for bouffants, I’ve always believed that bigger is better. Or, in the words of Magdalena de la Cruz, the protagonist of my novel So L.A. “As long as you have a good purse and big enough sunglasses you can get away with anything in Los Angeles.”

Case in point? See “Post Exhibit A” (archived by my mother) wherein I rock a gingham chambray jumper and fashion a pair of red sunglasses in perfect “Sunnies-Quite-Possibly-Bigger-than-my-Face” style. I was maybe two.

Come to think of it, it could be said that the best part about Los Angeles is the fact that you can wear Sunnies anywhere, anytime, always. It matters not that you’re indoors. Nor does it matter that it’s after dark. I’m going out on a glamor limb here, dangling dangerously from a date palm tree, but I’m going to admit that in addition to sporting Sunnies to match my dress, I may even have sunglasses for different qualities of light. I mean, doesn’t everyone?

My best pair of Sunnies, by far, were a vintage pair of off-white Dior glasses (see “Post Exhibit B”). They were HUGE in the best possible way. And they died a tragic death in the hands of my daughter, who, when she was two, went on a spiteful sunglass busting bender. She just snapped every pair she could find: crack, pop, burst, like a wishbone the week after Thanksgiving. I was devastated. In fact, I still am.

In the hours after, when I was in shock and unveiled disbelief, I rushed out of the house with my puffy eyes exposed and drove them to three (yes I said three) certified optometrists, an ophthalmologist, a jeweler and a patio-glass repair man (that was when I was really desperate) but all six told me the same thing: Ma’am I’m sorry but…

Even still I couldn’t part with them. I keep the left “arm” as well as the right “three-quarters” of these glasses (of these tinted, broken dreams) on my desk as a reminder of who I used to be. They are joined by four other, less meaningful pairs, that were also busted by the baby. It’s a variable vintage sunglasses graveyard.

My current (favorite) Sunnies are newer and slightly smaller (not by choice) and much less fabulous, but in quintessential Didion fashion, they are about three-and-one-half inches round and a muted grey (perhaps because I am still in mourning?)

Bridget Hoida’s new novel, So L.A. must be read poolside with a floppy hat. You can find it on Amazon, Barnes & Noble or buy it from the publisher, Lettered Press.

You can reach Bridget, typing behind oversized sunglasses, here: www.bridgethoida.com

Awesome shoes! (via @CoderGirlLiz)

Awesome shoes! (via @CoderGirlLiz)

Awesome shoes! (via @CoderGirlLiz)

That’s what I’m talkin’ ’bout, Liz!

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Titles & all of that ” ” … (introspection)

I’m often cut off mid-sentence and asked, “But..what do you wanna do?”.

Fair enough question.

(SPOILER: There are no images in this post)

I suppose operating from the gut can make sense to one’s self but not necessarily to others.

It isn’t as if I responsibly mapped out my professional trajectory like I was taught to do…Instead, I followed my heart (whatever that means) and learned important lessons along the way. But, that doesn’t help clarify things, does it?

Unfortunately, passion can lack the efficient jargon demanded by those who wish to make a quick assessment of another’s perceived added value.

How silly was I to add “passion” to the bulletpoints on my resume? The entire Dalek population would explode attempting to grasp this concept.

Passion is tough to quantify. Just ask any successful entrepreneur.

That said, using a wordcloud tool has failed to capture the essence of the value I can add to any organization – instinct, experience, heart, loyalty, intuition, perserverance, empathy, connection, et al…These terms are not trending on LinkedIn — Google alerts would’ve informed me, and I just checked.

So, since my unorthodox list of accomplishments are invisible to search engines (and, incomprehensible to Daleks), I decided to explicity define “success” for myself as a courtesy to my new friends and acquaintances.

Here is what my point B looks like:

*You’re having your A.M. coffee while reading about the biggest networking event of the year on a page in the WSJ.

(Blurb for one of many well-known international events)

The text reads:

Notable Speakers include:

Abby Joseph Cohen one of the most respected figures in investing circles and is the chief US investment strategist for Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Anna Wintour, Editor-in-Chief, Vogue

Carrie Fisher, Actress best known as Princess Leia

Meg Gomez, Makes handmade stationery & sells them on Etsy

Sarah Blakely, CEO & Founder, Spanx

Genevieve Bos, Founding Publisher, Pink Magazine

Sheila Kahanek, former Accountant, Enron.

*end scene

I hope that helped clarify some things for you.

Have a great weekend!!!

Best,

Meg

*end scene

 ;P
(SPOILER: To be continued…)

12 Business Lessons from a One-Woman-Show (guest post)

MyBohemianSummer from MyBohemianSummer saysHighlighted Post

The biggest thing that I have learned so far in the hand made business is to not take it personal. This is very hard for me, and for a lot of artists and crafters that I know, because what we do is personal. This is from an article that I read a couple of months ago, and I keep it handy to refresh myself when it is needed. Like a good swift kick in the pants. (christinekane.com/how-to-not-take-things-personally-a-practical-guide) Here are some tips that I love passing on since it is so relevant to us and what we do:

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