Bridget Hoida on: Sunglass Burial

I’ve always been a little bit, shall we say, irrational, devoted when it comes to my Sunnies. Like certain women from Texas who have a thing for bouffants, I’ve always believed that bigger is better. Or, in the words of Magdalena de la Cruz, the protagonist of my novel So L.A. “As long as you have a good purse and big enough sunglasses you can get away with anything in Los Angeles.”

Case in point? See “Post Exhibit A” (archived by my mother) wherein I rock a gingham chambray jumper and fashion a pair of red sunglasses in perfect “Sunnies-Quite-Possibly-Bigger-than-my-Face” style. I was maybe two.

Come to think of it, it could be said that the best part about Los Angeles is the fact that you can wear Sunnies anywhere, anytime, always. It matters not that you’re indoors. Nor does it matter that it’s after dark. I’m going out on a glamor limb here, dangling dangerously from a date palm tree, but I’m going to admit that in addition to sporting Sunnies to match my dress, I may even have sunglasses for different qualities of light. I mean, doesn’t everyone?

My best pair of Sunnies, by far, were a vintage pair of off-white Dior glasses (see “Post Exhibit B”). They were HUGE in the best possible way. And they died a tragic death in the hands of my daughter, who, when she was two, went on a spiteful sunglass busting bender. She just snapped every pair she could find: crack, pop, burst, like a wishbone the week after Thanksgiving. I was devastated. In fact, I still am.

In the hours after, when I was in shock and unveiled disbelief, I rushed out of the house with my puffy eyes exposed and drove them to three (yes I said three) certified optometrists, an ophthalmologist, a jeweler and a patio-glass repair man (that was when I was really desperate) but all six told me the same thing: Ma’am I’m sorry but…

Even still I couldn’t part with them. I keep the left “arm” as well as the right “three-quarters” of these glasses (of these tinted, broken dreams) on my desk as a reminder of who I used to be. They are joined by four other, less meaningful pairs, that were also busted by the baby. It’s a variable vintage sunglasses graveyard.

My current (favorite) Sunnies are newer and slightly smaller (not by choice) and much less fabulous, but in quintessential Didion fashion, they are about three-and-one-half inches round and a muted grey (perhaps because I am still in mourning?)

Bridget Hoida’s new novel, So L.A. must be read poolside with a floppy hat. You can find it on Amazon, Barnes & Noble or buy it from the publisher, Lettered Press.

You can reach Bridget, typing behind oversized sunglasses, here: www.bridgethoida.com

“…the beauty of letting things go…”

Bridget Hoida

 

“The beauty [of Los Angeles] is the beauty of letting things go; letting go of where you came from; letting go of old lessons; letting go of what you want for what you are, or what you are for what you want; letting go of so much—and that is a hard beauty to love.”—Michael Ventura, “Grand Illusion”Letters at 3 AM: Reports on Endarkenment

via Bridget Hoida on: hard beauty.

Bridget Hoida on: hard beauty

Bridget is a friend, mentor, inspiration, advisor, twitter follower, confidante, et cetera…

I learned a lot about self-acceptance from Bridget’s writing advice during my years as an undgrad (and afterwards).

As it turns out, writers view words as instruments by which individuals connect to others. I learned that writing can be formatted in any way as long as the message and the spirit of the message are successfully transported to another — carrying with it the essence of its source.

Writing is a vehicle.

And, unlike perfectly formatted bullets on a memo, the musings of a good writer isn’t only concerned with getting you to point B –she wants to take you on a ride!!!

Congrats on your beautiful book, B. And, thanks for the ride.

Love,

Meg

Bridget Hoida on: hard beauty.

This will make you smarter > Defining “genius”. (Video)

I often revisit this conversation between Malcolm Gladwell and television journalist, Robert Krulwich where they discuss what defines a “genius”.

This conversation looks at the following topics and questions:

  • Is it “good” to segregate the superstars from the average stars?
  • What makes Tiger “Tiger Woods”?
  • What if it was a rule that we couldn’t ask one another from which university we graduated?
  • What is the “selection effect”?
  • Is our education system “…run like a modeling agency”?

(If you don’t have a flash player, please use this link to view the interview. Thanks for stopping by.)

3P

*Raises Hand* “Guilty!!!” (img)

This happens when one’s preferred medium  is Social Media.

Source: tumblr.com via Pretty on Pinterest

Caitlin Flanagan: Combating cupcake culture

Quote of the day #Judgement

“Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For these there is hope. They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty. There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all.”

― Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray


(Love to Bridget for sharing this with me.)

Support anti-hoarding/Support our book drive!!

Join our google group and show your support!
(We want to help others “shed their stuff”!)







site:  groups.google.com/group/3Pnetwork

email:  3Pnetwork@groups.google.com

Are you settling for ‘good enough’? (links, images, videos)

misery isn’t happiness’s foe; ‘good enough’ is – in your personal and professional life! 

You’ve heard the comparison before:  a job search is like looking for a mate.

If this analogy is anywhere near accurate, then I’m currently reading the job seeker’s version of Neil Strauss’ “Rules of the Game”.
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His name is Harper.  And according to the story’s main character, he’s “big in the right places and small in the right places”.  The book’s title is “Harper’s Rules”, and the story is an entertaining account of the relationship between a superstar recruit and her superstar recruiter.

I don’t have an opinion on whether or not I see job-seeking as completely akin to mate-seeking, however, I agree there are at least a few similarities.  More importantly for myself, however, are the witty Harper-isms that make me laugh out loud and take notes.

Some examples of what we call “Harper-isms”:

“You’re riding Secretariat, love.  You don’t need to get on the merry-go-round.”
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“BOTTOM LINE:  If you’re acting like you’re leaving your job, you’re leaving your job.  It’s just a matter of timing and opportunity.  Sometimes we do the right things before we’ve figured out why they’re right.”
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“Are you staying because they “need you right now” and you “can’t do that to your colleagues?”  Are you disillusioned  but held hostage by guilt?”
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and my personal favorite…
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“misery isn’t happiness’s foe; ‘good enough’ is.” !!!



Some of “Harper’s Rules” on finding the best path to your dream job:

  1. Put your personal network on notice.
  2. Use direct, simple language.
  3. Network with two headhunters that specialize in your niche.
  4. Do your homework.
  5. Your resume is a highlight film; it’s SportsCenter, not the unedited game footage.
  6. Your resume is an advertisement; it is not an affidavit.
  7. Don’t accept a counteroffer after terminating your relationship with your employer.
  8. Cultures don’t change.  You assimilate or you leave.
  9. If you’ve stopped laughing, quit immediately.
  10. If none of the original reasons why you took the job are still valid, or you settled for less than what you were meant to do, your dream will haunt you till you leave.

Yup.   He’s a sexy recruiter alright.  And, I like his style (Apologies in advance for the plethora of Harper-isms you’ll be seeing in our tweets as I finish reading the book).

Have a great day!!!

xo,
Meg@myprettypinkponies.com

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Go, Secretariat!  Go!!!





More on this topic:
blog post by “The Regular Joe” that speaks to the same point.
More on the book, “Harper’s Rules” by Danny Cahill