Independence Day … Everyday!

How about you? How was YOUR day?

How about you? How was YOUR day?

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Titles & all of that ” ” … (introspection)

I’m often cut off mid-sentence and asked, “But..what do you wanna do?”.

Fair enough question.

(SPOILER: There are no images in this post)

I suppose operating from the gut can make sense to one’s self but not necessarily to others.

It isn’t as if I responsibly mapped out my professional trajectory like I was taught to do…Instead, I followed my heart (whatever that means) and learned important lessons along the way. But, that doesn’t help clarify things, does it?

Unfortunately, passion can lack the efficient jargon demanded by those who wish to make a quick assessment of another’s perceived added value.

How silly was I to add “passion” to the bulletpoints on my resume? The entire Dalek population would explode attempting to grasp this concept.

Passion is tough to quantify. Just ask any successful entrepreneur.

That said, using a wordcloud tool has failed to capture the essence of the value I can add to any organization – instinct, experience, heart, loyalty, intuition, perserverance, empathy, connection, et al…These terms are not trending on LinkedIn — Google alerts would’ve informed me, and I just checked.

So, since my unorthodox list of accomplishments are invisible to search engines (and, incomprehensible to Daleks), I decided to explicity define “success” for myself as a courtesy to my new friends and acquaintances.

Here is what my point B looks like:

*You’re having your A.M. coffee while reading about the biggest networking event of the year on a page in the WSJ.

(Blurb for one of many well-known international events)

The text reads:

Notable Speakers include:

Abby Joseph Cohen one of the most respected figures in investing circles and is the chief US investment strategist for Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Anna Wintour, Editor-in-Chief, Vogue

Carrie Fisher, Actress best known as Princess Leia

Meg Gomez, Makes handmade stationery & sells them on Etsy

Sarah Blakely, CEO & Founder, Spanx

Genevieve Bos, Founding Publisher, Pink Magazine

Sheila Kahanek, former Accountant, Enron.

*end scene

I hope that helped clarify some things for you.

Have a great weekend!!!

Best,

Meg

*end scene

 ;P
(SPOILER: To be continued…)

Harvard Business Review discusses: Work Addiction (#HBRChat)

HBR Exchange@HBRexchange

@prettypinkpro @4KM @padma8376 @sanchezjb We’ve quoted you on our  Highlights page – thanks for joining in! s.hbr.org/MNHjdX

[<a href=”http://storify.com/hbrexchange/hbrchat-overcome-your-work-addiction&#8221; target=”_blank”>View the story “HBRchat: Overcome Your Work Addiction” on Storify</a>]

 

Deets:

HBR Twitter chats: #HBRchat

Host: @HBRexchange

 

Add some spring to your step … in fancy shoes! (img) #3PCstyle

The Art of Being Well-dressed: Superfluous or Essential? Both.

Introduction

Some consider the art of dressing, fashion and styling as a superfluous use of one’s time and energy. They’re right. Fashion can be overthought and when combined with the forces of retail marketing, fashion can result in  addiction to consumption.

The Hollywood cliché of the teenage girl’s obsession with her image, shopping with her friends and becoming an over-accessorized one dimensional version of her true potential stems from a very real power fashion magazines, shows and other media have on our values. It can be a limiting existence to live life pursuing an impossible opportunity to become another Kardashian sister.

However, if taken seriously without being obsessively vain, the art of dressing becomes a tool for the sophisticated individual. Fashion – or, in the case of our topic, dressing – is akin to a product’s packaging in that it serves several important roles.

We liken the importance of dressing to the importance of a container; both are extensions of the product itself and both help create a product’s appeal, ensure its preservation, and operates as a means of communication between the brand and its target market.

 

Packaging 101

If you open most books about packaging, you’ll learn that an effective package provides a product with the following:

  1. Containment
  2. Protection
  3. Convenience
  4. Information
  5. Marketing

As a professional possessing valuable skills and talent to offer the world you, too, are a product that needs to be packaged appropriately to appeal to the audience you aim to reach.

Think about it. If a product’s packaging didn’t accurately reflect its contents, how would the buyer react upon discovering that the delicious marshmallows he brought home from the store were instead a package of raw tofu???

Being inappropriately ‘packaged’ will result in disappointments.

 

Proper Packaging: clothing that serves its purpose

So, how exactly do we package ourselves? Glad you asked.

Dressing up or down (or not at all) can be fun. However, when functioning in society, there are responsibilities we must honor before fulfilling our desire to amuse ourselves and do whatever we’d like without regard for rules.

Like a product’s container, our clothing must serve its primary functions before it acts as an extension of our individuality and brand’s message. Typography is useless on a box that doesn’t properly secure the eggs on its way to your kitchen from the grocery store.

In other words your clothes have responsibilites. Your clothing need to fulfill their responsibilities before they can scream, “Louis Vuitton!”.

As a courtesy, we’ve developed a guideline in the form of a checklist to make sure your outfit is at the very least serving its primary purpose.

Checklist: 

1. Containment – Does it sufficiently contain and cover its contents?

2. Protection – Is your outfit appropriate for the environment, weather, social context you’ll be wearing it to? (i.e. flip flops outdoors during a snowstorm, etc…)

3. Convenience – Does your clothing allow you to move comfortably and with ease? Does it fit you properly? Will you have difficulty performing at your optimum level in these clothes?

4. Information – What message does your clothing communicate to society as a whole?

5. Marketing – Are you wearing any symbols or styles that will connect with the specific group you wish to appeal to? Will your market be attracted to you given how you are presented?

(To be continued…)

How to effectively communicate with ANYONE…(guide)

I receive applicable and straightforward career advice by listening to the Manager Tools, LLC podcast.

One of the topics I found most useful is what hosts, Mark and Mike, refer to as “behavioral diversity”. In simple terms, behavioral diversity refers to the concept that our tendencies are some combination of four broad categories represented by the letters D,I,S & C in the DiSC model.

I won’t go into DiSC theory here as it is lengthy and there are better resources of information for this behavior identification model. You also have to take a test to better understand your own behavioral profile.

That said, if you’re already somewhat familiar with DiSC, the outline we provide in this post (below) of the basic behavior types may serve as a useful communication reference guide.

As Mark often says (via Drucker, perhaps), “communication is what the listener does”.

BeEffectiveWithDISC

Cheers!

Meg & the Ponies

Please note: the DiSC information was published and is owned by
© 2012 Manager Tools, LLC. All rights reserved

You will make all kinds of mistakes…

You will make all kinds of mistakes…

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Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Courtesy of MBA Online Program.com

Continue reading

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From Blogger to Intern: Lucy’s fashion internship at NorthSix… (magazine)

Read about a fashion blogger’s internship at a major Fashion Production Agency in
Glossy Magazine Issue 7…

http://static.issuu.com/webembed/viewers/style1/v2/IssuuReader.swf

More Glossy…

Pink Ponies Pins! (Pinterest)

vs.

Let’s play dress up on Pinterest!!!
Pink

Ponies
Pins

Career-Chic Sophisticate – A Visual Inspiration List…

Here’s a peak at some items on my list of my career style inspiration:
red tights with red pumps
classic trousers + blouse
nude nails
Black + grey pumps

What inspires your career wardrobe style?

For more images from my ever-growing list…visit PinkPoniesPins on Pinterest.

More on professional wear: Harper Bazaar’s How to Dress for Success article

Retrospectives: Gen.Y Rants on Relationships… (no pictures)

Let me be the first to tell you that I’m far from perfect. (This is an understatement)

I’ve screwed up simple situations that most of you would’ve probably handled with more maturity, tact and foresight.  

*enter growing pains + embarrassing realizations

I take time to wax introspective on my behavior, my thinking, my values, et cetera…to understand how I managed to make silly mistakes that my friends claim they wouldn’t have made. I mull this over until I’m satisfied and have come to grips with how I screwed up or inadvertently created a negative impression on others. (Please don’t ask why I spend too much time reflecting)

That being said, I’m certain all failing results I’ve been part of aren’t always caused primarily by my deficiencies. Deciding whom to blame is not a productive activity; it’s a waste of time.

OBJECTIVE:
However, I’m hoping my insight and reflection will provide perspective that will help others who like to mull things over.

CONCLUSION: 
I’ve decided that a lot of times, errors are combinations of misinterpreted facts, emotionally-charged mis-judgements and unnecessary conclusions people make about others.

The problem is, often times we tend to think our abilities to decipher and decode human behavior are a gazillion times better than they actually are. Sadly, we are only wasting our time when we sit and analyze others’ actions to try and determine WHY they behave the way they do.

Fact is, people’s motivations change all the time. Even if you pinpoint another’s motives and intentions, they aren’t helpful. For instance, if you’re someone’s boss, then your role requires you reduce risk by assessing others’ behaviors to predict their future behaviors – not judge your direct’s value as an individual.

Again, motivations will probably change. Behavioral tendencies will less likely change that much. 



CHALLENGES:

A. Needless to say, a person who believes he/she has the natural Freudian acumen and capacity (and time) to analyze enough behavioral data to comprehend others’ intentions is ineffective.

Again, ineffective. Why?

  1. you’re not Freud.
  2. you’re not smart enough to make those conclusions.
  3. you don’t know the person’s background (even if you do dig and waste time and resources to find background information about a person)
  4. you’re not in the person’s head.
  5. Your conclusions don’t matter and will probably won’t contribute to your overall purpose.
B. Many people attach their emotional response to others’ behaviors and consider it in their analysis of the individual. This leads to inaccurate assessments and relationship problems.
For example, some people (ahem) tend to be more assertive than others. This is fact. We all have different behavioral tendencies.
For instance, some may talk more quickly, occasionally interrupt you while your speaking, etc… However, these behaviors are not done to offend or hurt others’ feelings. They are merely tendencies that are emotionally neutral (most of the time in a professional environment). The person speaking often does not consider it an affront to behave more assertively than you. It is merely part of their behavioral inclinations as an individual.
*enter behavioral diversity What a concept!
C. As you can see, this could be a big problem at the workplace. 
For example, if a “boss” takes offense to his/her direct’s behavioral tendencies then decides said person is “rude”, “disrespectful”, etc… it will create a culture that shuts out good ideas and good people. 
A person who decides another is “disrespectful” vs. considering that the person’s behavior is “different” from what is familiar to themselves is focused on judgement and is not separating fact from emotion. Attaching these labels on people is not productive, correct, professional or a good technique for effective collaboration.
CLOSING THOUGHT:
Why not create less conflict by understanding that people each have their own behavioral tendencies and spend less time figuring out why the person who offended you is less ____________ than you? 
That way, you can productively help improve others’ behaviors to achieve the outcomes you mutually desire without creating discomfort between one another? What do you think?

…more rants

Hello, 2012!!! I Resolve To Become A Better Leader!

HBR’s John Coleman and Bill George provides us young ‘uns some important considerations when setting goals for ourselves this year.

1. Find a trustworthy mentor.
2. Join a leadership group.
3. Volunteer.
4. Work in/Travel in a new country.

…so far, I’ve accomplished all four in the last 20+ years.

For further details and the rest of the article, visit Meg.Email’s blog.

Carpe Diem!!!

Link to Meg Dot Email blog

Youth In The Office – Called out comment (Forbes.com) repost

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert

The article:


“I’m 24. I live in New York City. I hate my job. Of course, I’m not supposed to say that. I’m supposed to feel accomplished to be young and employed and have benefits in this economic environment.


My life is a series of boxes on an assembly line. Today is just another box on my calendar. Every day I shuffle between a city apartment and an office cube, typing into rectangles, sending papers, signing papers, filing papers. What I do is not important. That’s the problem….”



Our response:

 Dear youth in the office: I, too, belong in this group. And, I, too, have felt your frustration. I’ve held various occupations since I was 16, and I’ve pushed paper in Dilbert’s office. I struggle between not feeling on track to achieve my full potential and a reality check. If I may make a suggestion that would provide you with a fresh set of eyes, it would be this: …
Sit in a “real” diner. One that Jonathan Gold would never been interested in visiting. Perhaps one in a struggling small town. Take a seat, look into the kitchen and observe the hourly workers prepare your meal.
Breathing in fumes and lard day after day in hairnets covered in grease…Then observe them when they clean up at the end of the day. Rinsing the kitchen mats, rinsing other people’s food off dishes, mopping the floor (I used to whine about this). Then reflect on your perspective again. Passion about one’s work often comes from being proud of the job you’ve done no matter what type of work you do. Pride in one’s work brings the “joy” you described. Enjoyment in one’s work comes with the sense of ownership you get when you give even the smallest paper-pushing task your absolute best effort while biting your tongue. It comes from feeling like you’ve grown and have crossed a rite of passage. All those people at the top whom I admire and strive to emulate have had to “do the dishes” at some point in their lives. It’s a prerequisite and a rite of passage for anyone on the path to achievement. Best of luck to you. Onward!


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Your comment was called out!


On this post: Youth In The Office: Confessions Of A Fed-Up Employee



Ten years in "corporate America"…

…and, I didn’t even get a lousy shirt!

in case you didn’t know…


our [evolving] mission

Being a girl in this city (L.A.) and “making it” as a professional while keeping up with fashion, friends, family, style, relationships, fitness, reading and everything else is nearly impossible.  We could always benefit from more support from our friends, families, network and other resources within our reach.  



It’s our mission to provide readers insight by posting about lessons we’ve learned and the lessons we continue to learn.



The content we post is for anyone who could use some food for thought especially the young woman “standing in brand new designer shoes” weary to step forward.  We hope you’ll find value in stories shared by others who were in similar shoes…as pretty as the pair on your very own feet.  Walking tall and pretty in high-heels after stumbling isn’t easy.  It helps to know others who have been there, recovered and what they do keep “balanced” in their tall heels.

Thanks for visiting and we encourage your feedback and comments on how you manage to balance your life during your trajectory to success.  Take a nice deep breath.  Then, put your best foot forward and make big strides!!!  

Yours,


Pretty Pink Ponies (“3P”)


What I did to stay on point for today’s interview…

You know how champion athletes train extensively to
prepare for a competition?  Well,
that’s sorta how I prep for an interview. 
I
try to get in my “flow”.
Why do I think I’m qualified to provide you with
interview pointers?  Here’s some background:


I’ve been working since I was 15 ½ (Gold’s Gym was my
first gig), and I’ve experienced answering controversial questions confidently
with a big smile wearing a bikini and five-inch pumps on stage with girls who
are prettier, taller more “dazzling” than me, et cetera…and I’ve scored better
than they did in interviews. I landed my internship with a cold call. Between
my part-time jobs, volunteer jobs, and full-time work, I’ve probably been
interviewed and sized up by at least 25 hiring managers (and actual judges).
I
can honestly say I’m comfortable during interviews.
While the interview isn’t my weak spot, I’m aware I’ll
be speaking with big-boys (and big-girls) in first-rate companies.  These
companies are not “Mickey-Mouse” organizations; they demand a certain level of
professionalism and respect. If the person you’re interviewing with also
screens executive candidates, then they’re probably pretty good at judging
character. So, don’t B.S. them. A hiring manager isn’t going to be forgiving if
I’m less than par because I said “sorry” in a sweet voice.  These are
professionals with a job to do and my job is to make their job easier by being
prepared, honest and cooperative (unless I don’t want the job).
So,
I bring it.
If you’re a true pro, you understand what’s expected.
At the bare minimum, you must do your homework.
There’s
no such thing as being too prepared – only un
prepared.
Besides, I owe it to myself to behave like a high-level
professional and not like a rookie because that’s who I am. Also, recruiters
and managers are less forgiving about my small mistakes because I have years of
experience and they expect me to know better. And, they’re right!  Step up
or get off the plate!
How:
What’s your homework? An understanding of the
organization, its history, values and culture. And, more importantly, an
understanding of the job you’re being considered for. You might think this is
inconsequential because you’ll be learning about the company from the
recruiter, but trust me, they notice and they appreciate someone who takes
initiative. Not only that, but jumping into an organization without
understanding what the culture is like is just plain silly. 
If
your values don’t align with the people you work with, you’ll never advance in
the long run at that place.
I do my research on the person with whom I’m
interviewing as well as the company itself. I also have a checklist that I
complete before the actual interview. Within this checklist is a rating system
to gauge how much I truly want the job with the company.
This
is a two-way street afterall, and I’m interviewing companies just as much as
they’re interviewing me.
I have tons of experience and a lot of talent to offer,
and I’m not willing to settle for a something that is not a good fit. Also,
there’s no way I can single-handedly change the culture of an organization to
suit my style no matter how much passion or tenacity or drive I possess. 
I
know my weaknesses.
Knowing that a good fit is vital to my career
trajectory in the long-run, I have to first understand what I want from an
employer then be honest about whether they are willing to and have the ability
to provide these things for me. 
Keep
in mind: this is a negotiation.
If I accept the job, I’m making a commitment to do my
absolute best to provide the company with as much value as I can in the manner
by which I’m able and within the context of my formal role. By accepting a job
offer,
I’m
obligated to do what’s expected.
Not the very minimum.  Not what I can get away
with. I’m in it all the way. It’s a big deal and a formal commitment. And,
because I take what they asked of me seriously, I expect their investment in me
as well. I call this, “healthy relationship”. This reminds me of what my friend
tells his three-year old when she doesn’t want to do something she’s supposed
to,
“You
wanna be a big girl?  Then, act like a big girl.”
Mind you, I’m not always a big girl. Sometimes I get
lazy. Other times I’m tired, or immature. I find it tough to be on point 24/7. 
I like being goofy at times. And, I appreciate the different roles I have in
life. However, when the situation calls for it, I come through. I have to. Not
behaving like a ‘big girl’ during situations that call for maturity and
commitment cause major problems.  Stay on point.

(BTW, I got a second call back and booked a second
interview immediately after the first interview today.  The proof is in
the pudding. =) 

The Next Great Generation (Twitter chat)

Below is a recap of a recent Twitter Chat with TheNextGreatGeneration.com (@NextGreatGen).

Thanks, TNGG for hosting this chat regarding Gen Y and what we think about the current job market.  Below are our feedback and suggestions and the link to the original article on the TNGG’s site.

Thanks, TNGG!

3P

Link to article on TNGG

Hobbies that keep you relevant (images)


Embrace the robocalypse!
While you may not associate the activities below with traditional business-folk-type of activities (read:  Jack Welch doesn’t “do” web design), there are important correlations between the skills in employees employers find valuable and these not-so-typical hobbies…



1.Web Design: What competitive company doesn’t have or want an amazing website?  Online sites are the medium of communication of the future  yesterday. 
2.Blogging and Journaling: Aside from the obvious health benefits of writing in a journal (stress reducer), writing and blogging only helps improve your writing and thinking.  If you recognize the importance  of being an effective communicator and having “voice flexibility” (business format, web format, stage format, et cetera…), you would certainly find writing exercises one way to help with this…how do I know?  From my own improvement:  I already write better now than I did at 4:45am today.
3.Reading:  Specifically, our blog… (Do I need to justify this?)


essie@myprettypinkponies.com





Wharton comments on "Masculine Norms" and how they affect women’s career trajectories…


I don’t understand why professional norms are classified as either “masculine” or “feminine”. Perhaps a professional norm is sufficient without the hyper-focus on gender issues which mostly create unnecessary inflammation around examples.


‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

I don’t understand why professional norms are classified as either “masculine” or “feminine”. Perhaps a professional norm is sufficient without the hyper-focus on gender issues which mostly create unnecessary inflammation around examples.


‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

Professional Wardrobe: Creative vs. Traditional fields (images)

This post hopes to de-mystify dress codes in Creative Industries vs. Traditionally-run organizations by providing very broad and simplistic descriptions of each.  Obviously, while professionalism is tantamount in all organizations, there are differences in acceptable office wear depending on the organization.**


image 1





What defines a “creative industry”
Generally, “creative” companies in various sectors create ‘widgets’ that are unique and based on intellectual inspiration.  Creative fields include: advertising, architecture, publishing, software, art, design, fashion, film, music, games, TV, video games, etc….

“Judging from her fashion, I would imagine that Kelly sees design as the proper combination of key pieces. Take a look at these more casual ensembles, for example. Each is a much simpler silhouette with a more every day aesthetic, but there is an eye catching quality to each.” 


Since innovation is key, creative workplaces value and reward individuals who can think “outside-the-box” and create inspiration.  Usually, employees work within small teams on specific projects.  The teams are focused on successfully finishing projects in a profitable and timely fashion. 

Have you seen anything like this on the market?
Where one might find status symbols of wealth and success in traditional corporations expressed in styles that boast of heritage and a craftsmanship, (i.e. Mont Blanc pens, heirloom jewelry, Rolex watches, cuff links, boarding school affiliated insignia, Hermes scarves, Louis Vuitton luggage, etc…), in fields where human intellect and originality affect products and profit, the more esoteric the referenced aesthetic, the more value the individual is deemed to add.  Professionals dress in ways that differentiate themselves to signify their individual brand of creativity.

Interaction among team members and the exchange of ideas are encouraged. As a result, professional dress in these fields often serve as opportunities by which to display creativity, intellect and imagination (image 1).  Having a well-defined personal aesthetic becomes shorthand for brilliance and originality.  What new idea can this person bring to the group?  


The creative individual’s personal “brand” is the value they add to their organization, thus, they wear their brand proudly on their sleeve.


Uzo of Nars Cosmetics dictating her own brand of professional-wear.  She is a recognized for the originality she contributes to her field.  She is paid to think outside the box.  Her individuality and creative discoveries inspire others in her field.

Established business models:
Traditional corporate environments emphasize the organization’s vision, and each employee’s objective is to execute orders given from the top of the chain.  There is less importance placed on a person’s uniqueness. If you’re not in position to command orders, you’re not being paid to come up with ideas.  Ideas and best practices are provided to you. 

In other words, each group or functional division operates as one unit (read: everyone dresses alike) carrying out tasks outlined by the head of their departments.  A blueprint for how things are done most effectively is in place and provides guidelines for the most efficient way tasks should be carried out.

The focus is on the organization as a whole and the objective is to carry-out processes vital for the organization’s life.  Innovative ideas are provided by the organization’s leaders whose experience and expertise provide the group with the best direction to take.  Leadership in these organizations are paid to figure things out and make decisions;
others are paid to carry them out.  


“Separately, we are organized, results-driven and efficient.  Together, we are a well-functioning machine that will ensure your day-to-day operations are run effectively.”
These environments function well when individuals are consistent, predictable and view themselves as part of the whole. In other words, bold and “outside-the-box” thinking and clothing distract and disrupt the efficiency of a functioning streamlined process.  Imagine how disruptive it would be if we introduced a blood cell with fabulously glittered fuschia hotpants and the latest chloe jacket to a group of uniformly efficient red blood cells delivering blood to an organism’s heart.  In other words, shocking your team with your originality may debilitate the team’s ability to function and affect the livelihood of the organization as a whole.

“Our business unit has a process in place that can produce those widgets in half the time.  We, as a unit, are important to the organization’s bottom line.”
Each individual piece must fit well and operate under the same cadence to make the machine run smoothly.


“Hi, everyone.  I look just like my teammates in my collared, button-up shirt, and neutral-colored palette.  Also, this practical handbag carries useful tools making me a productive member of the organization.”


The corporate palette is simple:  grays, black and navy suits.  From topical view, groups are seen as one.  Again, the culture emphasizes efficiency, order and respect for an established blueprint.  There is a defined uniform.


“Give me an assignment, and you can consider it done.  I have a Navy Seals background and my goal is to help carry our team forward.”

While I make broad generalizations to illustrate my points, each office has its own culture and a smart job candidate will observe his/her surroundings to gain an understanding of culture.  Until then, prevent being a distraction by erring on the traditional side and observe people to understand what is generally acceptable in your new office environment.

Any healthy and productive organization will incorporate elements of each “type” in varying degrees depending on short-term and long-term goals.


CONCLUSION:

Whether and how individuality is expressed will depend on your field, company and immediate team.  Some professional environments invite individual taste to encourage exchange of ideas between team-members.  More established companies with operations in place will demand new employees to work according to their guidelines.  In both cases, the goal is to be professional, respectful and appropriately dressed.  Observation of one’s surroundings is the best way to tell what is considered acceptable in your new environment.

image 1

(**note: representations of “styles” in the above images are in sterile and generic form to illustrate points more clearly.  We understand this is not necessarily an accurate representation of groups as wholes.  Again, images are for demonstrative purposes only. Thanks.)

Source(s):
Imaginization:  The Art of Creative Management (business models)
Kelly Wearstler article by the NY Post

Harper Bazaar’s How to Dress for Success article

 

 

 

Do you make a great first impression?


(Note:  If you are not interested in being likeable, please stop reading)

Forget about eye-contact and firm handshakes, here are three ways to make a lasting impression…

related articles:
10 ways to make more time for yourself” by chronicbabe.com
“Nice girl = Bad Networker” (Thanks to Connected Life)

Closet Essentials – what do you wear when you work from home? (images)


I.  BEING PUT-TOGETHER AT HOME


I miss writing about office-wear.  


I miss wearing office-wear.


If this is your first visit to 3P, I’ll prepare you for what some have called my “vain” side.  I’m into wardrobe, shopping and trying to look my best (call me a “girl”).  That said, even when I’m at home, I’m somehow more productive when I’ve taken the time to “put myself together.  Continuing to “dress for the day” helps keep my priorities in a professional context.  Being dressed for business tasks makes sure the television, web, and phone calls don’t distract me from what I need to do that day.


 Since my current priorities mostly involve conversations between recruiters and HR people online and by phone, I have to feel comfortable and at ease, without feeling so relaxed I lose my professional sensibility.  In other words, bunny slippers are not part of my working-from-home wardrobe.  Do you feel like a superstar right when you roll out of bed?


II.  STAYING INDOORS

If truly staying indoors, I love wearing soft cotton shirts and pants with that fit well (not just your ol’ one-size-fits all sweatshirt).  Monrow brand makes fabulous vintage sweatpants and soft cotton tees that are tailored to fit a young woman’s frame properly.  J.Crew is another good place to buy basics (during sales, of course).  Although the silhouettes I describe are loose-fitting or relaxed-fitting, they are lounge-wear and not sleep-wear.  Pajamas all day are not allowed off-campus past sophomore year.

Soft, light cotton henleys, tees, tanks are definite ‘musts’.  The weather in L.A. quickly changes from scorching hot, to rain, to fog in a matter of minutes.  Lighter pieces are ideal here because they can be layered easily without adding bulk to your figure.
Dresses are also great for their ease of wear.  Dresses allow for efficient ‘wardrobe-styling’.  If you have a comfy jersey dress, it cuts your outfit-hunting time in half!
III.  RUNNING ERRANDS
When I have to run errands, I like to dress comfortably but, slightly more dressed up than what I consider lounge-wear.  I prefer the casual version (or “weekend version“) of office-wear (you never know if you’ll run into your future boss).  What I mean is, I wear less tailored versions of button-up dress shirts, or loose-fitting cardigans with denim.  I still wear loafers (mocs) and not flip-flops if I can help it.
What I described is a good balance between being put-together, comfortable, and mature (professional).  If I run into potential employers, former colleagues or anyone in my professional network, I’d feel confident that I have represented myself in good form even outside of a business setting.  At the same time, if I run into my friends, I could join them for lunch without having to change out of the  khaki/polo combo or any other outfits that are not appropriate for my age and personality…
CONCLUSION:  PREPARATION IS KEY!
It’s important to be put-together if you want to be productive.  There’s something about looking mature that makes one behave more responsibly (for most people).  If your goal isn’t to sit around like a vegetable on the couch and if you’d like to prevent yourself from falling into a lazy unproductive lull, mentally prepare yourself by dressing, then behaving like the energetic and responsible go-getter that you are!!!  Even Kobe has to warm up before games…
What do you wear on the weekends?  Do you present yourself as a mature and capable individual?

(the other “closet essentials” post)…

Interview Suit (image)

Interview Suit

simple.  classic.  no loud jewelry.  don’t forget your stockings.

Interview Suit by prettypinkponies featuring mary jane high heels

Youth In The Office: Fed-Up! (Forbes article)

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert

The article:


“I’m 24. I live in New York City. I hate my job. Of course, I’m not supposed to say that. I’m supposed to feel accomplished to be young and employed and have benefits in this economic environment.


My life is a series of boxes on an assembly line. Today is just another box on my calendar. Every day I shuffle between a city apartment and an office cube, typing into rectangles, sending papers, signing papers, filing papers. What I do is not important. That’s the problem….”



Our response:

 Dear youth in the office: I, too, belong in this group. And, I, too, have felt your frustration. I’ve held various occupations since I was 16, and I’ve pushed paper in Dilbert’s office. I struggle between not feeling on track to achieve my full potential and a reality check. If I may make a suggestion that would provide you with a fresh set of eyes, it would be this: …
Sit in a “real” diner. One that Jonathan Gold would never been interested in visiting. Perhaps one in a struggling small town. Take a seat, look into the kitchen and observe the hourly workers prepare your meal.
Breathing in fumes and lard day after day in hairnets covered in grease…Then observe them when they clean up at the end of the day. Rinsing the kitchen mats, rinsing other people’s food off dishes, mopping the floor (I used to whine about this). Then reflect on your perspective again. Passion about one’s work often comes from being proud of the job you’ve done no matter what type of work you do. Pride in one’s work brings the “joy” you described. Enjoyment in one’s work comes with the sense of ownership you get when you give even the smallest paper-pushing task your absolute best effort while biting your tongue. It comes from feeling like you’ve grown and have crossed a rite of passage. All those people at the top whom I admire and strive to emulate have had to “do the dishes” at some point in their lives. It’s a prerequisite and a rite of passage for anyone on the path to achievement. Best of luck to you. Onward!


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On this post: Youth In The Office: Confessions Of A Fed-Up Employee


Are you "web savvy"?

to our gen-x readers:  you follow blogs…you have a facebook page…heck, you even text instead of making phone calls…so, do you consider yourself “web-savvy”?

With the increasing popularity of generating buzz about oneself on the web, many web users and marketing-zealous individuals have posted all sorts of personal information, thoughts and other information that they wouldn’t necessarily want the universe to see.

I get goosebumps thinking about how mortifying it was to be the last to hear that I had sent an accidental social-media invitation to my bosses and their bosses’ bosses by being “trigger-happy” with the ‘send’ button…This is one of many many accidents that can occur when registering on sites.  And, while it has taken me a while to learn that everything written online is not only “written in ink”, but “etched in stone and stored forever”, I’m now more careful (perhaps not prudent enough) with what I post and what information I send on the web.

While we don’t have time to do extensive online researches of our names, companies and brands, one quick way to manage your reputation online is by signing up to get notifications when your name(s) – and any permutations thereof – are published online.

Google offers this service for free, and it takes less than 5 minutes to set up alerts if you already have a Google account.  


Here’s how:

  1. visit https://www.google.com/dashboard/
  2. Scroll down to the “Me on the Web” section
  3. Select “Set up search alerts for your data.”
  4. Select relevant boxes
  5. Add variations of your name(s) (i.e. “prettypinkponies”; “myprettypinkponies”; “pink ponies blog”; etc…


    xo,


    meg@myprettypinkponies.com

    Antique buttons…(images)

                                                         
    Add character to your suits by adding antique buttons…


    …search for buttons on etsy.com or ebay to find good deals…

    Wishing for a new suit, but too smart to spend hundreds of dollars?  Ideas:

    1.  add beautiful one-of-a-kind buttons to your existing suits.  (i.e. these antique brass buttons are beautiful agains a simple navy jacket)
    2.  No time to hunt for vintage buttons?  Got bad taste?  We can help…info@myprettypinkponies.com

    Dressing for Fall (When "Fall" is actually still Summer) (images)

    In other parts of the country, Autumn is the time
    of year when you pull light sweaters out of storage anticipating a drop in
    temperature.

    It’s already mid-September, and it’s still pretty
    warm out in SoCal.
     What does a girl do to prepare for the frigid a/c
    indoors while keeping cool and fresh outdoors?
    Layer a soft blouse underneath a light sweater.

    Keeping a light cardigan at the office at all times
    is always a smart move.
     It’s a great “band-aid” for unexpected
    cold weather or if you drop lunch on your blouse.
    That said, when it’s warm out, a light blouse
    that’ll keep your body cool and comfortable works well underneath a light
    sweater.
     Below are a couple of good examples of light bouses for your professional wardrobe to take you through the change in temperature without missing a beat.

    The burn oranges and warm browns are still light
    enough to wear with your warm-weather palettes.
     The cognac, light brown and butterscotch leather will keep you looking polished as you introduce deeper fall colors with your suits.