Boyfriends w/ D1 backgrounds = better relationships (teams)

“How do you manage people who are better than you?”

There Is An I In Team: HBR Presentation w/ Mark De Rond and Angela Herrin
Marvel comics, team, Xmen

Marvel comics, team, Xmen

I listened to a recent web presentation provided by the Harvard Business Review titled, “There Is An I In Team”.

I’m fascinated by collaboration among team members as a result of having had a couple of long term boyfriends who played Division I sports (Hot!).

It made very little sense to me in college that men can experience anger and frustration with a teammate or rival, duke it out, then grab a beer and hang out as friends the following day.

They seemed to be able to separate their roles on their teams from who they are off the team. But, how?!?!?

These abilities — a) getting over setbacks and moving forward, and b) separating one’s role on and off his/her team — are paramount to one’s chances of success in large organizations (i.e. Professor Xavier’s school for the gifted, or if you prefer reality, large world class corporations).

Marvel comics, team, Xmen

The HBR presentation I mentioned  is one of the better studies on how the best teams function, what makes teams effective, and how to manage teams to accomplish wins. De Rond takes his observations of university rowing teams and boat races to examine coordination between team members.

One insightful observation De Rond discovered in the results of team surveys is that high performers typically underestimate their own teammates**. And, as we all have experienced, this makes high performers or those who are highly intelligent dismissive of others.

If this is true, what can we do to exploit the value high performers can provide while mitigating the risks these high performers’ behavioral tendencies often cause?

Surprisingly, the answer isn’t found by forcing all team members to get along. It turns out that expressing emotional experiences and venting to teammates create winning performance***.

While most of us define team harmony as an absence of competitiveness between members, this is only half of the story. Competition (“lack of harmony”) cannot truly be forced out of individuals because it is innate. If suppressed, competition resurfaces in more destructive forms under the radar of team leaders and creates more dysfunction than if they were acknowledged, accepted and resolved in a psychologically safe and moderated space.

My favorite take away from this presentation is this: 

Harmony cannot be forced in teams. Harmony is created naturally when teams experience wins and achieve great things through collaboration with one another.

Continue reading

Titles & all of that ” ” … (introspection)

I’m often cut off mid-sentence and asked, “But..what do you wanna do?”.

Fair enough question.

(SPOILER: There are no images in this post)

I suppose operating from the gut can make sense to one’s self but not necessarily to others.

It isn’t as if I responsibly mapped out my professional trajectory like I was taught to do…Instead, I followed my heart (whatever that means) and learned important lessons along the way. But, that doesn’t help clarify things, does it?

Unfortunately, passion can lack the efficient jargon demanded by those who wish to make a quick assessment of another’s perceived added value.

How silly was I to add “passion” to the bulletpoints on my resume? The entire Dalek population would explode attempting to grasp this concept.

Passion is tough to quantify. Just ask any successful entrepreneur.

That said, using a wordcloud tool has failed to capture the essence of the value I can add to any organization – instinct, experience, heart, loyalty, intuition, perserverance, empathy, connection, et al…These terms are not trending on LinkedIn — Google alerts would’ve informed me, and I just checked.

So, since my unorthodox list of accomplishments are invisible to search engines (and, incomprehensible to Daleks), I decided to explicity define “success” for myself as a courtesy to my new friends and acquaintances.

Here is what my point B looks like:

*You’re having your A.M. coffee while reading about the biggest networking event of the year on a page in the WSJ.

(Blurb for one of many well-known international events)

The text reads:

Notable Speakers include:

Abby Joseph Cohen one of the most respected figures in investing circles and is the chief US investment strategist for Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Anna Wintour, Editor-in-Chief, Vogue

Carrie Fisher, Actress best known as Princess Leia

Meg Gomez, Makes handmade stationery & sells them on Etsy

Sarah Blakely, CEO & Founder, Spanx

Genevieve Bos, Founding Publisher, Pink Magazine

Sheila Kahanek, former Accountant, Enron.

*end scene

I hope that helped clarify some things for you.

Have a great weekend!!!

Best,

Meg

*end scene

 ;P
(SPOILER: To be continued…)

Happy Mother’s Day, mom!

My taste for fashion and professional clothing is greatly influenced by my mother.
Each morning, I watched her leave the house to run her medium-sized print ad company, VIRGO INC.


Always tailored; always ladylike.

Add some spring to your step … in fancy shoes! (img) #3PCstyle

Turn Enemies into Allies (#HBRchat)

[View the story “#HBRchat Topic, April 26: Turn Your Enemies into Allies” on Storify]

more #HBRChats

How to effectively communicate with ANYONE…(guide)

I receive applicable and straightforward career advice by listening to the Manager Tools, LLC podcast.

One of the topics I found most useful is what hosts, Mark and Mike, refer to as “behavioral diversity”. In simple terms, behavioral diversity refers to the concept that our tendencies are some combination of four broad categories represented by the letters D,I,S & C in the DiSC model.

I won’t go into DiSC theory here as it is lengthy and there are better resources of information for this behavior identification model. You also have to take a test to better understand your own behavioral profile.

That said, if you’re already somewhat familiar with DiSC, the outline we provide in this post (below) of the basic behavior types may serve as a useful communication reference guide.

As Mark often says (via Drucker, perhaps), “communication is what the listener does”.

BeEffectiveWithDISC

Cheers!

Meg & the Ponies

Please note: the DiSC information was published and is owned by
© 2012 Manager Tools, LLC. All rights reserved

Women and authentic leadership (by @RHRIntlLLP/ RHR International)

The piece attached in this post was produced by RHR International (@RHRIntlLLP), an organization dedicated to improving the performance of individuals, teams and business organizations.

We find the study to be unique in that RHR uses quantitative research and analysis to better understand how internal experiences are demonstrated in outward the leadership behavior of women in executive levels.

“We explored the internal psychological processes and resources of women leaders – “their inside,”
and how that interacts with “the outside” to create the experience of being a woman leader.”

Link to the article: Executive-Women-Leadership

You WILL stumble…

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Courtesy of MBA Online Program.com

Continue reading

Rate this:

You + Social Media = Career Advancement??? (#HBRChat Transcript)

 

What role does Social Media play in career advancement?

Harvard Business Review’s weekly chat discusses the topic with us…

Continue reading

From Blogger to Intern: Lucy’s fashion internship at NorthSix… (magazine)

Read about a fashion blogger’s internship at a major Fashion Production Agency in
Glossy Magazine Issue 7…

http://static.issuu.com/webembed/viewers/style1/v2/IssuuReader.swf

More Glossy…

Would You Survive this Job Interview (video)?

HBR Ideacast with Dr. ALICE HENDRICKSON EAGLY

Present position: James Padilla Chair of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Psychology, 
Faculty Fellow of Institute for Policy Research, and Professor of Management & 
Organizations, all at Northwestern University.
Address: Department of Psychology, Swift Hall, 2029 Sheridan Road, Northwestern 
University, Evanston, IL 60208-2710, USA
Telephone: (847) 467-5026; FAX (847) 491-7859
E-MAIL Address: eagly@northwestern.edu
UNIVERSITY DEGREES & HONORS
A. B. Summa Cum Laude (Social Relations); Radcliffe College (Harvard University), 
Cambridge, Massachusetts; June, 1960
Phi Beta Kappa, 1959
Phi Beta Kappa Ranking Senior Prize at Radcliffe College, 1960
National Merit Scholar, 1956-60
Fulbright Fellow (Norway), 1960-61
M. A.  (Psychology); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; June, 1963
Ph. D. (Social Psychology); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; December, 
1965
Woodrow Wilson Fellow, 1961-62
National Science Foundation Cooperative Graduate Fellow, 1962-65
Sigma Xi, 196

Pink Ponies Pins! (Pinterest)

vs.

Let’s play dress up on Pinterest!!!
Pink

Ponies
Pins

Career-Chic Sophisticate – A Visual Inspiration List…

Here’s a peak at some items on my list of my career style inspiration:
red tights with red pumps
classic trousers + blouse
nude nails
Black + grey pumps

What inspires your career wardrobe style?

For more images from my ever-growing list…visit PinkPoniesPins on Pinterest.

More on professional wear: Harper Bazaar’s How to Dress for Success article

HOME OFFICE vs. CORPORATE OFFICE – What’s your style???

CORPORATE OFFICE:

My office at home is different from my office at the workplace.
In the workplace, my goal was to maintain an efficient space with all the things I use on a regular basis close at hand.
I took care to create an efficient system that made it easy for me to reach for files, writing tools and other items I used several times/day.

I took care to make sure the items on my desk absolutely needed:  Cordless keypad, mouse, notebook, phone and lamp.  I also had one ceramic bud vase for the occasional flower I’d bring to the office with me to remind me of my balcony garden.

I also kept one of several piggy [mouse] banks on my desk for loose change.  A “savings account” for daily treats to the vending machine.

The space was efficient and allowed for quick storage, shredding completed tasks, quick-access to relevant information and sufficient lighting.

I kept a nice, firm flannel pillow on an ergonomic chair to support my lower back…

Overall, my work-space was devoid of my outside-of-work personality – which is quite different from my office at home.

OFFICE AT HOME:

Although I tote around my macbook and work anywhere and in every coffeeshop in the city, my office at home is mainly for thoughtful hand-written notes and a space to read…

(vases for sale on etsy)

golds, ambers, warm colors…
a beautiful and comfortable chair is essential.  

antique pencils, modern lighting, notebook, mirror (of course)…

…piggy bank, make up brush, pens, postage, clock…

box of stationery, golden ginko-leaf letter opener, Graphic Image notebook…

sentimental items of significance

…cuban cigar box filled with drawing supplies (charcoal pencils, erasers, leather notebook)…

…colored pens for highlighting…

Rebecca Minkoff leather kindle case…

moleskin-like dodocase (for kindle)…

I’m curious about your workspace…What do you keep on your desk at the office?  What does it say about you?  Is it similar to your office space at work?

– Meg  (“meg dot email”)

"…She wore it like she meant it." (a little background)

My taste for fashion and professional clothing is greatly
influenced by my mother.
Each morning, I watched her leave the house to run her
medium-sized print ad company, VIRGO INC.


Always tailored; always ladylike.
My mother wore knee-length pencil skirts without the subtle
twist of irony my generation feels compelled to add when they wear classic styles today…subtly mocking
a previous generation known for dainty manners and strings of white pearls. 

#Chanel
My mother cultivated a taste for classic feminine
silhouettes and she wore it like she meant it…
because she did.

 

Without a word, she entered a room and suddenly all were
aware that they were in the presence of a lady. And, to those who knew of her
her self-made success, it was understood that she ran her company with the
graceful strength of a savvy woman.
My own aesthetic often seems to reference my mother’s style
– pencil skirts, gold bangles, diamond studs and fancy high-heeled shoes. I
adore tailored sheath dresses, A-line skirts and silk blouses. The similarities
between my office style and my mother’s professional wear wasn’t apparent to me
until very recently when I discovered a dusty old photograph from childhood –
there I was in my Catholic school uniform walking on stage to receive an
academic award of some sort wearing bangles too big for my tiny forearms. In
the background was my mom in a classic yet angular A-line dress with geometric
patterns proudly walking with me…When I returned back to the
“present”, I realized that I own and wear a dress with the same
patterns, the same color, a similar silhouette in my own fancy shoes. I
continue to discover as I continue to find old photographs that I wear exactly
the same styles my mother used to wear when she was a young mother and business
woman in her early 20s.

=)

P.S.
The outdoors-y and playful and sometimes scruffy pieces of clothing you’d find in my closets are my own addition. My mother would never risk getting scars on her legs to climb trees.
  

Closet Essentials – Intro. + links

Our closets reflect our identity, our desired identity and the rites of passage we’ve crossed.  They know who we truly are, who we’ve been, and who we desire to become.  Looking in a person’s closet can tell a lot about how much a person has grown and how they’ve developed in a span of time.




With that in mind, our closets often times store items we no longer need, items others will benefit more from, yet lack essential items of dress which are essential to our current lives…

There have been many theories on “what every girl’s closet should have”…from Rachel Zoe, to Nina Garcia. 

The series of posts in this category, “fashion – closet essentials” will help identify what items of wear are essential based on Maslow’s theory of basic human needs (please google this if unfamiliar).  Read on.





“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist








“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

Retrospectives: Gen.Y Rants on Relationships… (no pictures)

Let me be the first to tell you that I’m far from perfect. (This is an understatement)

I’ve screwed up simple situations that most of you would’ve probably handled with more maturity, tact and foresight.  

*enter growing pains + embarrassing realizations

I take time to wax introspective on my behavior, my thinking, my values, et cetera…to understand how I managed to make silly mistakes that my friends claim they wouldn’t have made. I mull this over until I’m satisfied and have come to grips with how I screwed up or inadvertently created a negative impression on others. (Please don’t ask why I spend too much time reflecting)

That being said, I’m certain all failing results I’ve been part of aren’t always caused primarily by my deficiencies. Deciding whom to blame is not a productive activity; it’s a waste of time.

OBJECTIVE:
However, I’m hoping my insight and reflection will provide perspective that will help others who like to mull things over.

CONCLUSION: 
I’ve decided that a lot of times, errors are combinations of misinterpreted facts, emotionally-charged mis-judgements and unnecessary conclusions people make about others.

The problem is, often times we tend to think our abilities to decipher and decode human behavior are a gazillion times better than they actually are. Sadly, we are only wasting our time when we sit and analyze others’ actions to try and determine WHY they behave the way they do.

Fact is, people’s motivations change all the time. Even if you pinpoint another’s motives and intentions, they aren’t helpful. For instance, if you’re someone’s boss, then your role requires you reduce risk by assessing others’ behaviors to predict their future behaviors – not judge your direct’s value as an individual.

Again, motivations will probably change. Behavioral tendencies will less likely change that much. 



CHALLENGES:

A. Needless to say, a person who believes he/she has the natural Freudian acumen and capacity (and time) to analyze enough behavioral data to comprehend others’ intentions is ineffective.

Again, ineffective. Why?

  1. you’re not Freud.
  2. you’re not smart enough to make those conclusions.
  3. you don’t know the person’s background (even if you do dig and waste time and resources to find background information about a person)
  4. you’re not in the person’s head.
  5. Your conclusions don’t matter and will probably won’t contribute to your overall purpose.
B. Many people attach their emotional response to others’ behaviors and consider it in their analysis of the individual. This leads to inaccurate assessments and relationship problems.
For example, some people (ahem) tend to be more assertive than others. This is fact. We all have different behavioral tendencies.
For instance, some may talk more quickly, occasionally interrupt you while your speaking, etc… However, these behaviors are not done to offend or hurt others’ feelings. They are merely tendencies that are emotionally neutral (most of the time in a professional environment). The person speaking often does not consider it an affront to behave more assertively than you. It is merely part of their behavioral inclinations as an individual.
*enter behavioral diversity What a concept!
C. As you can see, this could be a big problem at the workplace. 
For example, if a “boss” takes offense to his/her direct’s behavioral tendencies then decides said person is “rude”, “disrespectful”, etc… it will create a culture that shuts out good ideas and good people. 
A person who decides another is “disrespectful” vs. considering that the person’s behavior is “different” from what is familiar to themselves is focused on judgement and is not separating fact from emotion. Attaching these labels on people is not productive, correct, professional or a good technique for effective collaboration.
CLOSING THOUGHT:
Why not create less conflict by understanding that people each have their own behavioral tendencies and spend less time figuring out why the person who offended you is less ____________ than you? 
That way, you can productively help improve others’ behaviors to achieve the outcomes you mutually desire without creating discomfort between one another? What do you think?

…more rants

Hello, 2012!!! I Resolve To Become A Better Leader!

HBR’s John Coleman and Bill George provides us young ‘uns some important considerations when setting goals for ourselves this year.

1. Find a trustworthy mentor.
2. Join a leadership group.
3. Volunteer.
4. Work in/Travel in a new country.

…so far, I’ve accomplished all four in the last 20+ years.

For further details and the rest of the article, visit Meg.Email’s blog.

Carpe Diem!!!

Link to Meg Dot Email blog

Youth In The Office – Called out comment (Forbes.com) repost

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert

The article:


“I’m 24. I live in New York City. I hate my job. Of course, I’m not supposed to say that. I’m supposed to feel accomplished to be young and employed and have benefits in this economic environment.


My life is a series of boxes on an assembly line. Today is just another box on my calendar. Every day I shuffle between a city apartment and an office cube, typing into rectangles, sending papers, signing papers, filing papers. What I do is not important. That’s the problem….”



Our response:

 Dear youth in the office: I, too, belong in this group. And, I, too, have felt your frustration. I’ve held various occupations since I was 16, and I’ve pushed paper in Dilbert’s office. I struggle between not feeling on track to achieve my full potential and a reality check. If I may make a suggestion that would provide you with a fresh set of eyes, it would be this: …
Sit in a “real” diner. One that Jonathan Gold would never been interested in visiting. Perhaps one in a struggling small town. Take a seat, look into the kitchen and observe the hourly workers prepare your meal.
Breathing in fumes and lard day after day in hairnets covered in grease…Then observe them when they clean up at the end of the day. Rinsing the kitchen mats, rinsing other people’s food off dishes, mopping the floor (I used to whine about this). Then reflect on your perspective again. Passion about one’s work often comes from being proud of the job you’ve done no matter what type of work you do. Pride in one’s work brings the “joy” you described. Enjoyment in one’s work comes with the sense of ownership you get when you give even the smallest paper-pushing task your absolute best effort while biting your tongue. It comes from feeling like you’ve grown and have crossed a rite of passage. All those people at the top whom I admire and strive to emulate have had to “do the dishes” at some point in their lives. It’s a prerequisite and a rite of passage for anyone on the path to achievement. Best of luck to you. Onward!


You received this email because you chose to receive alerts on Called-Out comments. 


Your comment was called out!


On this post: Youth In The Office: Confessions Of A Fed-Up Employee



Young and Underemployed: Called-Out Comment (Forbes.com) repost…

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert


Your comment was called out!

On this post: Young And Underemployed: The Lasting Effects Of The Lost Generation

 Undergraduate education is not technical school. Some of us attend school because we value a well-rounded education, not to secure employment after graduation. Educational background (undergraduate) are less relevant than internships, volunteer experience and on-campus activities. There’s a distinction between going to a trade school and attending a university.

Link to article 

Professional Baggage: A Pretty Pink Ponies Presentation (video)

My holiday wishlist this year : tools to increase productivity while organizing business files. Have you seen Clooney in Up In the Air?. *Hint: beautiful like Grace Kelly, but more utilitarian than a Navy Seal.


As you probably know, professional presentation is a priority for Pretty Pink Ponies. 
Professional presentation may seem like a bunch of fluff to some, but how you organize yourself and your business documents and tech tools reflects your ambition, success and how seriously you view yourself as a professional.
Obviously, a young woman who is well-groomed, well-mannered and polished non-verbally communicates that she’s on the ball and manages her life in an effective way. How you store your documents, gadgets and files reflects your ability to handle chaos and prioritize efficiently.
It’s not about being “pretty”, it’s more a matter of having an understanding that you’re a seasoned pro and not a naive rookie.
It has been studied and discussed ad nauseam that we are judged by how we are perceived. You might as well do what you can to ensure your image consistently reiterates your professionalism and effectiveness.
Hope you’re having a great weekend!
Meg
(featuring: Travelteq Trash leather bags, Travelteq iPad case, Travelteq notebooks, Kate Spade, Tory Burch laptop bag, Deisel briefcase, etc…)

Prof. Growth: Handling tricky work situations (# LadderChatter transcript)

LadderChatter (#ladderchatter) is a weekly Twitter chat with Jodi Glickman about how to succeed in your job and ways to improve your job performance and / or position yourself to move up to more responsibility.







This week, we (@PrettyPinkPro) participated in the chat about handling tricky work situations by painfully looking at our mistakes and the valuable lessons we learned from them. The chat was moderated by career experts, @EmilyBennington & @greatonthejob.

Transcript from the Dec. 13, 2011 #LadderChatter below:

http://www.scribd.com/embeds/75758233/content?start_page=1&view_mode=list&access_key=key-x4o3uipyfhcyx6gicfi

#LadderChatter on Twitter _ All Tweets _ 2011-12-14 _ Tweet Reports

(function() { var scribd = document.createElement(“script”); scribd.type = “text/javascript”; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = “http://www.scribd.com/javascripts/embed_code/inject.js”; var s = document.getElementsByTagName(“script”)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })();

Ten years in "corporate America"…

…and, I didn’t even get a lousy shirt!

Pretty Professional Pumps! (slideshow)

Are you in the market for a pair of everyday office shoes?

For the smart, professional, chic woman who can’t live life without style, below are examples of office-appropriate footwear to inspire confidence as you march into the boardroom to present your brilliant ideas to colleagues.  (No one will know the secret to your spectacular presentation!) Go get ’em!

https://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf

Here are some other things to keep in mind when shopping for shoes:

Shoe anatomy
How to wear tall boots without looking (post-Halloween)
The rest of your wardrobe: The Fundamentals – “Closet Essentials” post

VOTE! (Click on link below)

Hello friends!

Please vote for the image Pretty Pink Ponies submitted to the “Out of Office” Photo competition by clicking the link below.

Thank you very much!

VOTE!

What I did to stay on point for today’s interview…

You know how champion athletes train extensively to
prepare for a competition?  Well,
that’s sorta how I prep for an interview. 
I
try to get in my “flow”.
Why do I think I’m qualified to provide you with
interview pointers?  Here’s some background:


I’ve been working since I was 15 ½ (Gold’s Gym was my
first gig), and I’ve experienced answering controversial questions confidently
with a big smile wearing a bikini and five-inch pumps on stage with girls who
are prettier, taller more “dazzling” than me, et cetera…and I’ve scored better
than they did in interviews. I landed my internship with a cold call. Between
my part-time jobs, volunteer jobs, and full-time work, I’ve probably been
interviewed and sized up by at least 25 hiring managers (and actual judges).
I
can honestly say I’m comfortable during interviews.
While the interview isn’t my weak spot, I’m aware I’ll
be speaking with big-boys (and big-girls) in first-rate companies.  These
companies are not “Mickey-Mouse” organizations; they demand a certain level of
professionalism and respect. If the person you’re interviewing with also
screens executive candidates, then they’re probably pretty good at judging
character. So, don’t B.S. them. A hiring manager isn’t going to be forgiving if
I’m less than par because I said “sorry” in a sweet voice.  These are
professionals with a job to do and my job is to make their job easier by being
prepared, honest and cooperative (unless I don’t want the job).
So,
I bring it.
If you’re a true pro, you understand what’s expected.
At the bare minimum, you must do your homework.
There’s
no such thing as being too prepared – only un
prepared.
Besides, I owe it to myself to behave like a high-level
professional and not like a rookie because that’s who I am. Also, recruiters
and managers are less forgiving about my small mistakes because I have years of
experience and they expect me to know better. And, they’re right!  Step up
or get off the plate!
How:
What’s your homework? An understanding of the
organization, its history, values and culture. And, more importantly, an
understanding of the job you’re being considered for. You might think this is
inconsequential because you’ll be learning about the company from the
recruiter, but trust me, they notice and they appreciate someone who takes
initiative. Not only that, but jumping into an organization without
understanding what the culture is like is just plain silly. 
If
your values don’t align with the people you work with, you’ll never advance in
the long run at that place.
I do my research on the person with whom I’m
interviewing as well as the company itself. I also have a checklist that I
complete before the actual interview. Within this checklist is a rating system
to gauge how much I truly want the job with the company.
This
is a two-way street afterall, and I’m interviewing companies just as much as
they’re interviewing me.
I have tons of experience and a lot of talent to offer,
and I’m not willing to settle for a something that is not a good fit. Also,
there’s no way I can single-handedly change the culture of an organization to
suit my style no matter how much passion or tenacity or drive I possess. 
I
know my weaknesses.
Knowing that a good fit is vital to my career
trajectory in the long-run, I have to first understand what I want from an
employer then be honest about whether they are willing to and have the ability
to provide these things for me. 
Keep
in mind: this is a negotiation.
If I accept the job, I’m making a commitment to do my
absolute best to provide the company with as much value as I can in the manner
by which I’m able and within the context of my formal role. By accepting a job
offer,
I’m
obligated to do what’s expected.
Not the very minimum.  Not what I can get away
with. I’m in it all the way. It’s a big deal and a formal commitment. And,
because I take what they asked of me seriously, I expect their investment in me
as well. I call this, “healthy relationship”. This reminds me of what my friend
tells his three-year old when she doesn’t want to do something she’s supposed
to,
“You
wanna be a big girl?  Then, act like a big girl.”
Mind you, I’m not always a big girl. Sometimes I get
lazy. Other times I’m tired, or immature. I find it tough to be on point 24/7. 
I like being goofy at times. And, I appreciate the different roles I have in
life. However, when the situation calls for it, I come through. I have to. Not
behaving like a ‘big girl’ during situations that call for maturity and
commitment cause major problems.  Stay on point.

(BTW, I got a second call back and booked a second
interview immediately after the first interview today.  The proof is in
the pudding. =) 

The Next Great Generation (Twitter chat)

Below is a recap of a recent Twitter Chat with TheNextGreatGeneration.com (@NextGreatGen).

Thanks, TNGG for hosting this chat regarding Gen Y and what we think about the current job market.  Below are our feedback and suggestions and the link to the original article on the TNGG’s site.

Thanks, TNGG!

3P

Link to article on TNGG

Hobbies that keep you relevant (images)


Embrace the robocalypse!
While you may not associate the activities below with traditional business-folk-type of activities (read:  Jack Welch doesn’t “do” web design), there are important correlations between the skills in employees employers find valuable and these not-so-typical hobbies…



1.Web Design: What competitive company doesn’t have or want an amazing website?  Online sites are the medium of communication of the future  yesterday. 
2.Blogging and Journaling: Aside from the obvious health benefits of writing in a journal (stress reducer), writing and blogging only helps improve your writing and thinking.  If you recognize the importance  of being an effective communicator and having “voice flexibility” (business format, web format, stage format, et cetera…), you would certainly find writing exercises one way to help with this…how do I know?  From my own improvement:  I already write better now than I did at 4:45am today.
3.Reading:  Specifically, our blog… (Do I need to justify this?)


essie@myprettypinkponies.com