Titles & all of that ” ” … (introspection)

I’m often cut off mid-sentence and asked, “But..what do you wanna do?”.

Fair enough question.

(SPOILER: There are no images in this post)

I suppose operating from the gut can make sense to one’s self but not necessarily to others.

It isn’t as if I responsibly mapped out my professional trajectory like I was taught to do…Instead, I followed my heart (whatever that means) and learned important lessons along the way. But, that doesn’t help clarify things, does it?

Unfortunately, passion can lack the efficient jargon demanded by those who wish to make a quick assessment of another’s perceived added value.

How silly was I to add “passion” to the bulletpoints on my resume? The entire Dalek population would explode attempting to grasp this concept.

Passion is tough to quantify. Just ask any successful entrepreneur.

That said, using a wordcloud tool has failed to capture the essence of the value I can add to any organization – instinct, experience, heart, loyalty, intuition, perserverance, empathy, connection, et al…These terms are not trending on LinkedIn — Google alerts would’ve informed me, and I just checked.

So, since my unorthodox list of accomplishments are invisible to search engines (and, incomprehensible to Daleks), I decided to explicity define “success” for myself as a courtesy to my new friends and acquaintances.

Here is what my point B looks like:

*You’re having your A.M. coffee while reading about the biggest networking event of the year on a page in the WSJ.

(Blurb for one of many well-known international events)

The text reads:

Notable Speakers include:

Abby Joseph Cohen one of the most respected figures in investing circles and is the chief US investment strategist for Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Anna Wintour, Editor-in-Chief, Vogue

Carrie Fisher, Actress best known as Princess Leia

Meg Gomez, Makes handmade stationery & sells them on Etsy

Sarah Blakely, CEO & Founder, Spanx

Genevieve Bos, Founding Publisher, Pink Magazine

Sheila Kahanek, former Accountant, Enron.

*end scene

I hope that helped clarify some things for you.

Have a great weekend!!!

Best,

Meg

*end scene

 ;P
(SPOILER: To be continued…)

Harvard Business Review discusses: Work Addiction (#HBRChat)

HBR Exchange@HBRexchange

@prettypinkpro @4KM @padma8376 @sanchezjb We’ve quoted you on our  Highlights page – thanks for joining in! s.hbr.org/MNHjdX

[<a href=”http://storify.com/hbrexchange/hbrchat-overcome-your-work-addiction&#8221; target=”_blank”>View the story “HBRchat: Overcome Your Work Addiction” on Storify</a>]

 

Deets:

HBR Twitter chats: #HBRchat

Host: @HBRexchange

 

Funny…

 

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Courtesy of MBA Online Program.com

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Closet Essentials – Intro. + links

Our closets reflect our identity, our desired identity and the rites of passage we’ve crossed.  They know who we truly are, who we’ve been, and who we desire to become.  Looking in a person’s closet can tell a lot about how much a person has grown and how they’ve developed in a span of time.




With that in mind, our closets often times store items we no longer need, items others will benefit more from, yet lack essential items of dress which are essential to our current lives…

There have been many theories on “what every girl’s closet should have”…from Rachel Zoe, to Nina Garcia. 

The series of posts in this category, “fashion – closet essentials” will help identify what items of wear are essential based on Maslow’s theory of basic human needs (please google this if unfamiliar).  Read on.





“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist








“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

Hello, 2012!!! I Resolve To Become A Better Leader!

HBR’s John Coleman and Bill George provides us young ‘uns some important considerations when setting goals for ourselves this year.

1. Find a trustworthy mentor.
2. Join a leadership group.
3. Volunteer.
4. Work in/Travel in a new country.

…so far, I’ve accomplished all four in the last 20+ years.

For further details and the rest of the article, visit Meg.Email’s blog.

Carpe Diem!!!

Link to Meg Dot Email blog

@prettypinkpro: "Hire Friday Twitter Chat" (aka #HFChat)…recap by @EmploymentGuide

The quoted dialogue below was gathered by Brandon Lawson (aka @EmploymentGuide) during an online chat on Twitter last week. These weekly discussions are referred to as “HFChats” – for Hire Friday chats. The discussions between job seekers, and HR professionals provide insight to how hiring decisions are made.
We’re glad Brandon found our response worth mentioning on his site. Thanks, Brandon!
05. December 2011 | Show Originial
This past Friday, we took part in another Hire Friday Chat forum on Twitter. If you were not a part of the fun, I’ll bring you up to speed. Our Hire Friday Chat topic was about The Art of Asking Interview Questions, and was hosted by John Kador (@jkador) and Adam Eisenstein (@McGrawHillJobs). This was a very educational forum, explaining why it is important for jobseekers to ask questions during the interview. Here is a recap of the chat’s questions and some of the best answers: 
Q1. Why is it important to ask questions? 
A1: @JanisSpirit: Asking questions shows engagement, involvement and wanting the job. ASK! 
Q2. What kinds of questions are appropriate to ask?
A2: @DavidALee: Ask questions you can’t find answers elsewhere. If its on the website and you ask…Fail!
Q3. Should you save your questions until the end of the interview?
A3: @BrendenMWright: An interview is a conversation, a dialogue. It’s not a cross-examination. Engage!  
Q4. What are the best questions you’ve heard?
A4: @prettypinkpro: What is the leadership like in the organization? What is the leadership like in this particular division? 
A4: 
@comerecommended: That I’ve heard: “How would you define ‘success’ at this position?”
Q5. Should you ask the interviewer for a critique?
A5: @MikePetras: Ask in softer way: What is the next step in the process? Sometimes they’ll tip their hand. 
Q6. Why should you ask for the job?
A6: @ResumeDrEliz: Sure. If you truly want the position, close with a powerful, enthusiastic statement that says just that. 

Employment Guide.com article here

(Thanks for the mention, @EmploymentGuide!)

Regards,

@prettypinkpro

Closet Essentials – Part II. Checklist (images)

 Checklist/tools: 
(retail and corporations refer to this as “business casual”) shirt, casual bottoms, flats, bag
“Business Casual”:
What a ‘worker’ wears in an office setting and other professional environments – vs. workers at a construction site – when formality isn’t required etc..
1.  basic white button up + closed toe pumps 2.  the sheath dress 3.  khakis + dark closed-to pumps 4. blouse + pencil skirt 5. separates  6. basic white shirt + solid black A-Line skirt
Your boss might appreciate your new Bottega Veneta bag, however, he/she cares more about how well you do your job and whether or not you can identify and respect office culture.  While some might have the luxury of expressing their unique individuality (including taking their pets to the office) at their workplace, many people start at an entry-level position in a large, secure company for health benefits, a steady stream of income, mobility and other smart reasons.  I can’t speak for all offices around the world, however, there’s a universal guideline to what is considered an “appropriate” and professional wardrobe.  Again, it would be prudent to start with basics and observe your particular company and office culture and deviate from the basics once you’ve learned what is ‘acceptable’ at your particular office.  Once you’ve got the basics down and earned a stripe or two, then perhaps you can add some “flair”.  When you’re at the top, you can wear and make people wear whatever you want.

Here are some common sense considerations that A LOT of professionals are too smart/busy/ lazy to think about:
  • fit, proportion, fabric, color(s)
  • clean?
  • stains?
  • wrinkled?
  • distracting?
  • comfortable?
  • appropriate undergarments?
represent your maturity, respect and professionalism at the office.  dressing like like you know your industry will set the tone for yourself as well as those around you.  carpe diem!
(to be continued…)
“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist