Independence Day … Everyday!

Bridget Hoida on: Sunglass Burial

I’ve always been a little bit, shall we say, irrational, devoted when it comes to my Sunnies. Like certain women from Texas who have a thing for bouffants, I’ve always believed that bigger is better. Or, in the words of Magdalena de la Cruz, the protagonist of my novel So L.A. “As long as you have a good purse and big enough sunglasses you can get away with anything in Los Angeles.”

Case in point? See “Post Exhibit A” (archived by my mother) wherein I rock a gingham chambray jumper and fashion a pair of red sunglasses in perfect “Sunnies-Quite-Possibly-Bigger-than-my-Face” style. I was maybe two.

Come to think of it, it could be said that the best part about Los Angeles is the fact that you can wear Sunnies anywhere, anytime, always. It matters not that you’re indoors. Nor does it matter that it’s after dark. I’m going out on a glamor limb here, dangling dangerously from a date palm tree, but I’m going to admit that in addition to sporting Sunnies to match my dress, I may even have sunglasses for different qualities of light. I mean, doesn’t everyone?

My best pair of Sunnies, by far, were a vintage pair of off-white Dior glasses (see “Post Exhibit B”). They were HUGE in the best possible way. And they died a tragic death in the hands of my daughter, who, when she was two, went on a spiteful sunglass busting bender. She just snapped every pair she could find: crack, pop, burst, like a wishbone the week after Thanksgiving. I was devastated. In fact, I still am.

In the hours after, when I was in shock and unveiled disbelief, I rushed out of the house with my puffy eyes exposed and drove them to three (yes I said three) certified optometrists, an ophthalmologist, a jeweler and a patio-glass repair man (that was when I was really desperate) but all six told me the same thing: Ma’am I’m sorry but…

Even still I couldn’t part with them. I keep the left “arm” as well as the right “three-quarters” of these glasses (of these tinted, broken dreams) on my desk as a reminder of who I used to be. They are joined by four other, less meaningful pairs, that were also busted by the baby. It’s a variable vintage sunglasses graveyard.

My current (favorite) Sunnies are newer and slightly smaller (not by choice) and much less fabulous, but in quintessential Didion fashion, they are about three-and-one-half inches round and a muted grey (perhaps because I am still in mourning?)

Bridget Hoida’s new novel, So L.A. must be read poolside with a floppy hat. You can find it on Amazon, Barnes & Noble or buy it from the publisher, Lettered Press.

You can reach Bridget, typing behind oversized sunglasses, here: www.bridgethoida.com

How’s your style? Will it help you reach success? (#3PCstyle)

#3PCstyle details: https://myprettypinkponies.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/3pcstyle.pdf

Join our Twittter/Pinterest conversation with Fashion Designer, Lando Ortega tonight at 6:30 (PT).

Lando provides us with his expert opinion on the following:

  • Does fashion or style matter? Why/Why not?
  • What kind of impact does styling and fashion have on women?
  • How do we dress for who we really are (vs. who we wish to be) – body type, fit, style, fabric, drape…?
Please feel free to interject with follow up questions and thoughts after our guest has responded to the current question. Thank you!!!
3P
New to Twitter chat??? Start here! (Guidelines on participating on Twitter chats)
Resources:
Edith Head's How to Dress for Success
Sasha Charnin Morrison's Secrets of Stylists: An Insider's Guide To Styling The Stars

The Art of Being Well-dressed: Superfluous or Essential? Both.

Introduction

Some consider the art of dressing, fashion and styling as a superfluous use of one’s time and energy. They’re right. Fashion can be overthought and when combined with the forces of retail marketing, fashion can result in  addiction to consumption.

The Hollywood cliché of the teenage girl’s obsession with her image, shopping with her friends and becoming an over-accessorized one dimensional version of her true potential stems from a very real power fashion magazines, shows and other media have on our values. It can be a limiting existence to live life pursuing an impossible opportunity to become another Kardashian sister.

However, if taken seriously without being obsessively vain, the art of dressing becomes a tool for the sophisticated individual. Fashion – or, in the case of our topic, dressing – is akin to a product’s packaging in that it serves several important roles.

We liken the importance of dressing to the importance of a container; both are extensions of the product itself and both help create a product’s appeal, ensure its preservation, and operates as a means of communication between the brand and its target market.

 

Packaging 101

If you open most books about packaging, you’ll learn that an effective package provides a product with the following:

  1. Containment
  2. Protection
  3. Convenience
  4. Information
  5. Marketing

As a professional possessing valuable skills and talent to offer the world you, too, are a product that needs to be packaged appropriately to appeal to the audience you aim to reach.

Think about it. If a product’s packaging didn’t accurately reflect its contents, how would the buyer react upon discovering that the delicious marshmallows he brought home from the store were instead a package of raw tofu???

Being inappropriately ‘packaged’ will result in disappointments.

 

Proper Packaging: clothing that serves its purpose

So, how exactly do we package ourselves? Glad you asked.

Dressing up or down (or not at all) can be fun. However, when functioning in society, there are responsibilities we must honor before fulfilling our desire to amuse ourselves and do whatever we’d like without regard for rules.

Like a product’s container, our clothing must serve its primary functions before it acts as an extension of our individuality and brand’s message. Typography is useless on a box that doesn’t properly secure the eggs on its way to your kitchen from the grocery store.

In other words your clothes have responsibilites. Your clothing need to fulfill their responsibilities before they can scream, “Louis Vuitton!”.

As a courtesy, we’ve developed a guideline in the form of a checklist to make sure your outfit is at the very least serving its primary purpose.

Checklist: 

1. Containment – Does it sufficiently contain and cover its contents?

2. Protection – Is your outfit appropriate for the environment, weather, social context you’ll be wearing it to? (i.e. flip flops outdoors during a snowstorm, etc…)

3. Convenience – Does your clothing allow you to move comfortably and with ease? Does it fit you properly? Will you have difficulty performing at your optimum level in these clothes?

4. Information – What message does your clothing communicate to society as a whole?

5. Marketing – Are you wearing any symbols or styles that will connect with the specific group you wish to appeal to? Will your market be attracted to you given how you are presented?

(To be continued…)

Confidently “un-pretty”. (images)

Audrey Hepburn
When I worked full time in corporate America, I was always polished and groomed at the office. I worked in an environment where presentation and details made a huge impact on the perception of one’s sense of professionalism.

That said, it was always so refreshing to become “un-pretty” during weekends.

What does it mean to be “un-pretty”? First, let’s take a look at what “pretty” means:

I define ‘pretty’ as being polite, pleasant and polished.  “Pretty” is the very essence of being a lady — coiffed hair, a manicure, a poise presentation, warm, approachable and socially graceful. (Think of a house party’s hostess – friendly and sociable). Someone “pretty” offers you coffee and cookies when you visit their homes. The “pretty” girl tells you how great you look (to simplify the concept); she is concerned about whether or not you’re comfortable and considers what your preferences are.

When I use the term “un-pretty”, I’m not implying that I made an effort to look unattractive (although, a lot of times, this was the case). What I mean is, my style of presentation was less ladylike and lacked the polish and niceties one would expect from a pageant-trained woman.

How does one achieve a “pretty” look?

Feminine make up highlighting the shape of one’s eyes + full lips + groomed brows and hairstyle + polished ready-to-face-the-camera style + tailored and put-togehter – any piece of hair out of place

I love the “un-pretty” side of my closet as much as the polished and tailored pieces I own. It’s necessary, at times, to wear wrinkled shirts, athletic shoes, cotton tees and unruly hair. I say this because I think it’s an advantage to be comfortable even without having to project the socially-constructed version of “girl”. You can be attractive in various ways — wearing pearls and a tiara or sneakers and a baseball cap.

To me, an un-pretty style can convey the gritty sexiness of Marlon Brando’s Stanley Kowalski.

Un-pretty means dressing with style without having to make a lot of effort — in So Cal this laid-back style is one that many non- L.A. natives try very hard to emulate. It’s the confidence in one’s self without having to look like a doll who took two hours to apply make up.

It’s an image that actors and models (who spend their working days in full make-up) naturally have on their days off. A look that conveys the understanding that if they wanted to, they could very well shave their scruff and be as pretty as they come. The “unpretty” girl doesn’t necessarily say ‘please’ or ‘thank you’ in a bubbly voice. She may give you a smirk or a nod of acknowledgement if she’s pleased with you.

Simplified, the “unpretty” girl asks you for a smoke without taking into consideration whether or not you approve of her smoking. She is not as self-conscious as her socially-graceful “pretty” girl counterpart.

How does one achieve this un-pretty too-cool-to-care style?

“undone hair” + cotton tee + element of relaxed or athletic gear – bubbly persona – string of pearls – “matchy-matchy” accessories + grit + attitude…

It’s an image that says, “I’ve got better things to do than try and please everyone I encounter on the street. I’m more than just eye-candy and amusement — I’ve got more important roles to play.” 
I’m sure Sienna Miller (above) is a very pleasant and classy lady. However, I can guarantee that there are probably times when she could care less about what flavor cupcake would make your day. On those days, if you stopped her in the street to chat with her about your exciting new puppy and tell her that it would be really cool to have a picture of you two together, she would somehow let you know that there are other priorities in her day that are a bit more important than hearing your about your puppy’s outfit and how much you’d love to update your Facebook profile picture.
Do you have an “un-pretty” side? How do you celebrate it?
More images of Pretty vs. Un-pretty
Meg@PoniesLLC.com
More:


Closet Essentials – Intro. + links

Our closets reflect our identity, our desired identity and the rites of passage we’ve crossed.  They know who we truly are, who we’ve been, and who we desire to become.  Looking in a person’s closet can tell a lot about how much a person has grown and how they’ve developed in a span of time.




With that in mind, our closets often times store items we no longer need, items others will benefit more from, yet lack essential items of dress which are essential to our current lives…

There have been many theories on “what every girl’s closet should have”…from Rachel Zoe, to Nina Garcia. 

The series of posts in this category, “fashion – closet essentials” will help identify what items of wear are essential based on Maslow’s theory of basic human needs (please google this if unfamiliar).  Read on.





“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist








“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

Professional Presence Quiz: "What Would You Say?" (presentation)

Pretty Professional Pumps! (slideshow)

Are you in the market for a pair of everyday office shoes?

For the smart, professional, chic woman who can’t live life without style, below are examples of office-appropriate footwear to inspire confidence as you march into the boardroom to present your brilliant ideas to colleagues.  (No one will know the secret to your spectacular presentation!) Go get ’em!

https://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf

Here are some other things to keep in mind when shopping for shoes:

Shoe anatomy
How to wear tall boots without looking (post-Halloween)
The rest of your wardrobe: The Fundamentals – “Closet Essentials” post

Professional Wardrobe: Creative vs. Traditional fields (images)

This post hopes to de-mystify dress codes in Creative Industries vs. Traditionally-run organizations by providing very broad and simplistic descriptions of each.  Obviously, while professionalism is tantamount in all organizations, there are differences in acceptable office wear depending on the organization.**


image 1





What defines a “creative industry”
Generally, “creative” companies in various sectors create ‘widgets’ that are unique and based on intellectual inspiration.  Creative fields include: advertising, architecture, publishing, software, art, design, fashion, film, music, games, TV, video games, etc….

“Judging from her fashion, I would imagine that Kelly sees design as the proper combination of key pieces. Take a look at these more casual ensembles, for example. Each is a much simpler silhouette with a more every day aesthetic, but there is an eye catching quality to each.” 


Since innovation is key, creative workplaces value and reward individuals who can think “outside-the-box” and create inspiration.  Usually, employees work within small teams on specific projects.  The teams are focused on successfully finishing projects in a profitable and timely fashion. 

Have you seen anything like this on the market?
Where one might find status symbols of wealth and success in traditional corporations expressed in styles that boast of heritage and a craftsmanship, (i.e. Mont Blanc pens, heirloom jewelry, Rolex watches, cuff links, boarding school affiliated insignia, Hermes scarves, Louis Vuitton luggage, etc…), in fields where human intellect and originality affect products and profit, the more esoteric the referenced aesthetic, the more value the individual is deemed to add.  Professionals dress in ways that differentiate themselves to signify their individual brand of creativity.

Interaction among team members and the exchange of ideas are encouraged. As a result, professional dress in these fields often serve as opportunities by which to display creativity, intellect and imagination (image 1).  Having a well-defined personal aesthetic becomes shorthand for brilliance and originality.  What new idea can this person bring to the group?  


The creative individual’s personal “brand” is the value they add to their organization, thus, they wear their brand proudly on their sleeve.


Uzo of Nars Cosmetics dictating her own brand of professional-wear.  She is a recognized for the originality she contributes to her field.  She is paid to think outside the box.  Her individuality and creative discoveries inspire others in her field.

Established business models:
Traditional corporate environments emphasize the organization’s vision, and each employee’s objective is to execute orders given from the top of the chain.  There is less importance placed on a person’s uniqueness. If you’re not in position to command orders, you’re not being paid to come up with ideas.  Ideas and best practices are provided to you. 

In other words, each group or functional division operates as one unit (read: everyone dresses alike) carrying out tasks outlined by the head of their departments.  A blueprint for how things are done most effectively is in place and provides guidelines for the most efficient way tasks should be carried out.

The focus is on the organization as a whole and the objective is to carry-out processes vital for the organization’s life.  Innovative ideas are provided by the organization’s leaders whose experience and expertise provide the group with the best direction to take.  Leadership in these organizations are paid to figure things out and make decisions;
others are paid to carry them out.  


“Separately, we are organized, results-driven and efficient.  Together, we are a well-functioning machine that will ensure your day-to-day operations are run effectively.”
These environments function well when individuals are consistent, predictable and view themselves as part of the whole. In other words, bold and “outside-the-box” thinking and clothing distract and disrupt the efficiency of a functioning streamlined process.  Imagine how disruptive it would be if we introduced a blood cell with fabulously glittered fuschia hotpants and the latest chloe jacket to a group of uniformly efficient red blood cells delivering blood to an organism’s heart.  In other words, shocking your team with your originality may debilitate the team’s ability to function and affect the livelihood of the organization as a whole.

“Our business unit has a process in place that can produce those widgets in half the time.  We, as a unit, are important to the organization’s bottom line.”
Each individual piece must fit well and operate under the same cadence to make the machine run smoothly.


“Hi, everyone.  I look just like my teammates in my collared, button-up shirt, and neutral-colored palette.  Also, this practical handbag carries useful tools making me a productive member of the organization.”


The corporate palette is simple:  grays, black and navy suits.  From topical view, groups are seen as one.  Again, the culture emphasizes efficiency, order and respect for an established blueprint.  There is a defined uniform.


“Give me an assignment, and you can consider it done.  I have a Navy Seals background and my goal is to help carry our team forward.”

While I make broad generalizations to illustrate my points, each office has its own culture and a smart job candidate will observe his/her surroundings to gain an understanding of culture.  Until then, prevent being a distraction by erring on the traditional side and observe people to understand what is generally acceptable in your new office environment.

Any healthy and productive organization will incorporate elements of each “type” in varying degrees depending on short-term and long-term goals.


CONCLUSION:

Whether and how individuality is expressed will depend on your field, company and immediate team.  Some professional environments invite individual taste to encourage exchange of ideas between team-members.  More established companies with operations in place will demand new employees to work according to their guidelines.  In both cases, the goal is to be professional, respectful and appropriately dressed.  Observation of one’s surroundings is the best way to tell what is considered acceptable in your new environment.

image 1

(**note: representations of “styles” in the above images are in sterile and generic form to illustrate points more clearly.  We understand this is not necessarily an accurate representation of groups as wholes.  Again, images are for demonstrative purposes only. Thanks.)

Source(s):
Imaginization:  The Art of Creative Management (business models)
Kelly Wearstler article by the NY Post

Harper Bazaar’s How to Dress for Success article

 

 

 

Closet Essentials – what do you wear when you work from home? (images)


I.  BEING PUT-TOGETHER AT HOME


I miss writing about office-wear.  


I miss wearing office-wear.


If this is your first visit to 3P, I’ll prepare you for what some have called my “vain” side.  I’m into wardrobe, shopping and trying to look my best (call me a “girl”).  That said, even when I’m at home, I’m somehow more productive when I’ve taken the time to “put myself together.  Continuing to “dress for the day” helps keep my priorities in a professional context.  Being dressed for business tasks makes sure the television, web, and phone calls don’t distract me from what I need to do that day.


 Since my current priorities mostly involve conversations between recruiters and HR people online and by phone, I have to feel comfortable and at ease, without feeling so relaxed I lose my professional sensibility.  In other words, bunny slippers are not part of my working-from-home wardrobe.  Do you feel like a superstar right when you roll out of bed?


II.  STAYING INDOORS

If truly staying indoors, I love wearing soft cotton shirts and pants with that fit well (not just your ol’ one-size-fits all sweatshirt).  Monrow brand makes fabulous vintage sweatpants and soft cotton tees that are tailored to fit a young woman’s frame properly.  J.Crew is another good place to buy basics (during sales, of course).  Although the silhouettes I describe are loose-fitting or relaxed-fitting, they are lounge-wear and not sleep-wear.  Pajamas all day are not allowed off-campus past sophomore year.

Soft, light cotton henleys, tees, tanks are definite ‘musts’.  The weather in L.A. quickly changes from scorching hot, to rain, to fog in a matter of minutes.  Lighter pieces are ideal here because they can be layered easily without adding bulk to your figure.
Dresses are also great for their ease of wear.  Dresses allow for efficient ‘wardrobe-styling’.  If you have a comfy jersey dress, it cuts your outfit-hunting time in half!
III.  RUNNING ERRANDS
When I have to run errands, I like to dress comfortably but, slightly more dressed up than what I consider lounge-wear.  I prefer the casual version (or “weekend version“) of office-wear (you never know if you’ll run into your future boss).  What I mean is, I wear less tailored versions of button-up dress shirts, or loose-fitting cardigans with denim.  I still wear loafers (mocs) and not flip-flops if I can help it.
What I described is a good balance between being put-together, comfortable, and mature (professional).  If I run into potential employers, former colleagues or anyone in my professional network, I’d feel confident that I have represented myself in good form even outside of a business setting.  At the same time, if I run into my friends, I could join them for lunch without having to change out of the  khaki/polo combo or any other outfits that are not appropriate for my age and personality…
CONCLUSION:  PREPARATION IS KEY!
It’s important to be put-together if you want to be productive.  There’s something about looking mature that makes one behave more responsibly (for most people).  If your goal isn’t to sit around like a vegetable on the couch and if you’d like to prevent yourself from falling into a lazy unproductive lull, mentally prepare yourself by dressing, then behaving like the energetic and responsible go-getter that you are!!!  Even Kobe has to warm up before games…
What do you wear on the weekends?  Do you present yourself as a mature and capable individual?

(the other “closet essentials” post)…

Tall Boots 2011 (37 photos)

Stop. Read this post before shopping… (images)

Is that new dress worth the splurge?  Let’s see how much cheaper it would cost to try and re-create the same designer look:


We can certainly appreciate the craftsmanship of a well-made designer dress.  However, sometimes, it makes very little difference in presentation whether or not what you’re wearing costs over 3x as much as much as a similar ensemble.

The few times high-cost in designer clothing can be worth the price you’re paying:

1)  The quality of fabric – cashmere, silk, leather, etc…
2)  Service – does the store offer great service (alterations?  selection?  appointment with qualified and informed stylists?  extensive knowledge on what makes the product unique?  etc…)?
3)  Shoes – Poorly made shoes are just plain bad for you.  They’re uncomfortable, they need to be replaced more often than well-made shoes, and they affect the “spring in your step”.
The key thing to remember is that THE WOMAN MAKES THE CLOTHES.  In the end, it’s YOU who dictates your presentation, not the garment – irrespective of its price or craftsmanship.
Cheers!
3P
(Sources:  experience shopping and buying too many clothes, experience working in clothing stores, pageant-training, conversations with salespeople, etc…)

Dressing for Fall (When "Fall" is actually still Summer) (images)

In other parts of the country, Autumn is the time
of year when you pull light sweaters out of storage anticipating a drop in
temperature.

It’s already mid-September, and it’s still pretty
warm out in SoCal.
 What does a girl do to prepare for the frigid a/c
indoors while keeping cool and fresh outdoors?
Layer a soft blouse underneath a light sweater.

Keeping a light cardigan at the office at all times
is always a smart move.
 It’s a great “band-aid” for unexpected
cold weather or if you drop lunch on your blouse.
That said, when it’s warm out, a light blouse
that’ll keep your body cool and comfortable works well underneath a light
sweater.
 Below are a couple of good examples of light bouses for your professional wardrobe to take you through the change in temperature without missing a beat.

The burn oranges and warm browns are still light
enough to wear with your warm-weather palettes.
 The cognac, light brown and butterscotch leather will keep you looking polished as you introduce deeper fall colors with your suits.

Rock them boots, gurrrl! (slideshow)

Darlings, Below are fantastic ways to wear tall boots without looking like a walking parody of a dominatrix.

Tall boots need not be synonymous with “night life”…Observe the refreshing take on the tall boot below.

https://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf

Taste.  Make yours good.

Louboutin may lose Red Sole Trademark!?! (article)

Wow.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry 8/10/2011


Subject: Louboutin May Lose Red Sole Trademark After Judge Denies Injunction Against Yves Saint Laurent

fashionologie
Louboutin May Lose Red Sole Trademark After Judge Denies Injunction Against Yves Saint Laurent
>> While it remains to be seen whether Christian Louboutin will retain its red-sole trademark, a Manhattan …

Adding to Basics (images)

i was running an errand at my favorite stationery store and had to park my car around the corner.  i was drawn to the interesting aesthetic of a particular store window i hadn’t seen before, and decided to stop in…
although the style seemed familiar (think:  American Apparel), the style of the brand was a bit edgier…more chic.  the store was filled with soft cotton basics in solid colors albeit cut in trendier styles.

while the pieces looked like items one can find in other stores in L.A., the interesting interior design and paintings on the shelves made me curious.  i was greeted by the boutique’s lovely host, miss ashley.  ashley gave me the low-down on the store’s genesis and eventually introduced me to the owner and his family (thanks, ash).


i write about this to point out how easily one can create various “looks” starting with “basic pieces”.  coming straight from a corporate setting, i walked into the store wearing:  a silk cami + sweater, black slacks, pearls, and a pair of black pumps.  by updating my top (read:  throwing something over my cami), i created various styles…with just one piece.
+ classic shirt in navy
+ striped sweater
+ fine cotton hoodie
+ classic shirt + hat
+ light cotton tank
+ kate moss screenprint tank



1.  basics + classic shirt in navy
2.  basics + striped sweater
3.  basics + fine cotton hoodie
4.  basics + classic shirt + hat
5.  basics + light cotton tank

6.  basics + kate moss screenprint tank


thank you jessy, mariam, joy and ashley!!!  this is one of our favorite new stores!!


Closet Essentials – Part II. Checklist (images)

 Checklist/tools: 
(retail and corporations refer to this as “business casual”) shirt, casual bottoms, flats, bag
“Business Casual”:
What a ‘worker’ wears in an office setting and other professional environments – vs. workers at a construction site – when formality isn’t required etc..
1.  basic white button up + closed toe pumps 2.  the sheath dress 3.  khakis + dark closed-to pumps 4. blouse + pencil skirt 5. separates  6. basic white shirt + solid black A-Line skirt
Your boss might appreciate your new Bottega Veneta bag, however, he/she cares more about how well you do your job and whether or not you can identify and respect office culture.  While some might have the luxury of expressing their unique individuality (including taking their pets to the office) at their workplace, many people start at an entry-level position in a large, secure company for health benefits, a steady stream of income, mobility and other smart reasons.  I can’t speak for all offices around the world, however, there’s a universal guideline to what is considered an “appropriate” and professional wardrobe.  Again, it would be prudent to start with basics and observe your particular company and office culture and deviate from the basics once you’ve learned what is ‘acceptable’ at your particular office.  Once you’ve got the basics down and earned a stripe or two, then perhaps you can add some “flair”.  When you’re at the top, you can wear and make people wear whatever you want.

Here are some common sense considerations that A LOT of professionals are too smart/busy/ lazy to think about:
  • fit, proportion, fabric, color(s)
  • clean?
  • stains?
  • wrinkled?
  • distracting?
  • comfortable?
  • appropriate undergarments?
represent your maturity, respect and professionalism at the office.  dressing like like you know your industry will set the tone for yourself as well as those around you.  carpe diem!
(to be continued…)
“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

Closet Essentials – Part II. (images)

(…continues from Closet Essentials – Part I.)

Part II.  Safety Needs per Maslow




Let’s put “safety needs” in a more accessible context.  Who protects us, provides us with law and order, and decides what we can and can’t do in society if we don’t want to be imprisoned (“limits”)?  Yes…the state.  What does this governing body expect in return?  Responsible citizenship.  What does that mean?  It means we have to hold jobs and pay taxes.  
Now, how do we hold a job?  In other words, what will we wear to work from 9-5 in a typical entry-level position within a corporation?  “Part II.” provides insight to a category is referred to as “business casual” (note:  this is for a hypothetical setting in a generic corporation — yes, I understand creative fields, etc…have different dress codes).

Part II.  The Professional
Objective:  fit into the company’s culture without offending one’s boss and being seen as a professional.  That’s the only image we need at the office:  a professional.  Your goal is to impress your boss with the great job you’re doing.  Anything other motivations are irrelevant and will have to be dropped.

Tools:  company uniform, closed-toe shoes, nothing distracting and nothing that invites attention that delineates us from our job duty.

I know this doesn’t sound like the glamorous vision we had in mind as freshmen in college and we all thought we would wear fancy couture to the office everyday a la “Devil Wears Prada”, however, there are plenty other occasions where you can wear your sexy and flashy outfits.  And, if your priority is to keep your job (vs. become the office homecoming queen), then we must observe and follow guidelines.  (Read:  you are not Carrie Bradshaw and there are no paparazzi in the office for whom you need wear your vintage Halston dress.

You might also like the following links:
1)  “Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist
2)  How to wear tall boots

Closet Essentials – Part I. Checklist (images)

Checklist/tools: (retail refers to this as “basics”) shirt, casual bottoms, flats, bags, etc…

“The Shirt”:
Tees, knits, button-ups, etc..










I’m not at all trying to dissuade you from justifying wearing your ten-year-old concert shirt/free-when-you-sign-up-for-a-credit-card-shirt/inappropriate-cartoon-you-got-as-a-gift-shirt/raggedy juicy couture sweats/etc… with the old excuse of being “economical”/making use of all your resources effectively…My point simply is that irrespective of your preferences and style — whether you’re miss hot-to-trot super-duper-model or too-deep-to-follow-fashion’s “rules” — have a ‘basic shirt’ as a default when having to be seen in public. 

Bottoms:
skirt, khakis, denim, cargo, etc… 
There are no rules.  However, there are guidelines.  From most relevant to least, when taking care of business around town, some things to consider when choosing bottoms:  
  • Are they clean?
  • Do they fit me well?
  • Are they comfortable?
  • Are they washable/easy to maintain?
  • Will they coordinate with > 75% of my tops?

Let this be a guideline from which to deviate your outfits.  Show respect for the people with whom you’ll interact while demonstrating maturity by being well ‘put-togeter’ (whatever this looks like according to your perosnal style).  If you run into your clients, employer, colleagues, highschool sweetheart, next weekend’s date…would you be embarrassed in what you’re in? 

(to be continued…)
“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

Closet Essentials – Part I. (img)


Part I.  Basic Needs (per Maslow)





In current vernacular, “basic needs” means things we have no option to say ‘no’ to (i.e. paying utility bills, rent/mortgage, visiting the bank, feeding our children, buying cat litter & doggie treats, post office, grocery store, et cetera…).  So to tie this tenuously with fashion, “Part I.” discusses what to wear when ‘out and about running errands’. 


Part I.  Running Errands
Objective:  get things done comfortably, without getting bothered by unnecessary attention, altercations, or other time-wasters…
Tools:  basic inoffensive clothing, flat shoes, container for documents, phone, car keys, etc…
(I don’t know about you, but I don’t particularly find running errands the highlight of my week.  While looking good is essential, looking like you’re desperate for a date or like you just rolled out of bed yesterday and are new to society’s basic expectations of decent public decorum will probably take you off track to getting things done as quickly as possible and getting home to get ready for an actual date.)

(continues in “Part I. checklist)

Closet Essentials – Intro (images)

Our closets reflect our identity, our desired identity and the rites of passage we’ve crossed.  They know who we truly are, who we’ve been, and who we desire to become.  Looking in a person’s closet can tell a lot about how much a person has grown and how they’ve developed in a span of time.

With that in mind, our closets often times store items we no longer need, items others will benefit more from, yet lack essential items of dress which are essential to our current lives…

There have been many theories on “what every girl’s closet should have”…from Rachel Zoe, to Nina Garcia. 

The series of posts in this category, “fashion – closet essentials” will help identify what items of wear are essential based on Maslow’s theory of basic human needs (please google this if unfamiliar).  Read on.





“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist








“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

If the Shoe Fits… (img)

Things to consider when buying a pair of heels to avoid walking like rookie:

Shoe by Oscar De La Renta (2011)
Like buying a bra, knowing your size isn’t enough…you must try the product on to ensure proper and comfortable fit.  The risk of being uncomfortable and being unable to return a worn shoe is worth avoiding.
basic shoe anatomy:
Heel Cup
Padding/Arch Support
Straps (occasional)
The Sole
The Heel
The Decoration

Revisit: Closet Essentials

We’re working on organizing the information on our blog so our readers can find content more easily. For instance, we put a lot of thought into our “Closet Essentials” articles, but somehow they’re tough to find…Until we find a better system of organization, please use the following links at the bottom of each article to navigate from Part I. to Part II., etc…


Thanks for reading.

“Closet Essentials” Series:
  Intro > Part. I checklist I. > Part II. / checklist II. > Part III. / checklist

sophisticated wedges

(no she didn’t) oh, yes. 

yes, she most certainly did.

pour la victoirie wedge sandalas:

Thursday (img)

Thursday’s outfit

Thursday

Thursday by prettypinkponies featuring a pencil skirt

Wednesday – Grace Kelly (img)

What she wore on Wednesday…

wednesday

wednesday by prettypinkponies featuring clutch handbags

Tuesday Outfit (img)

Perfect suit separates to wear late summer/early fall

Tuesday

Tuesday by prettypinkponies featuring suede heels

orange you glad it’s summer?

orange you glad it's summer?
what other color bright enough to compete with the glare of the hot sun?

what other color so perfect with white, neutrals and deep brown sandals??

orange you glad it’s summer? by prettypinkponies featuring metal shades


Wait!!! Read this before splurging on that designer dress… (images)

Is that new dress worth the splurge?  Let’s see how much cheaper it would cost to try and re-create the same designer look:



While we can appreciate the craftsmanship of a designer dress, sometimes, it truly makes very little difference in presentation whether or not what you’re wearing costs over 3x as much as a much similar ensemble.
The few times high-cost in designer clothing can be worth the price you’re paying:
1)  The quality of fabric – cashmere, silk, leather, etc…
2)  Service – does the store offer great service (alterations?  selection?  appointment with qualified and informed stylists?  extensive knowledge on what makes the product unique?  etc…)?
3)  Shoes – Poorly made shoes are just plain bad for you.  They’re uncomfortable, they need to be replaced more often than well-made shoes, and they affect the “spring in your step”.
The key thing to remember is that THE WOMAN MAKES THE CLOTHES.  In the end, it’s YOU who dictates your presentation, not the cost of the garment.
Cheers!
3P
(Sources:  experience shopping and buying too many clothes, experience working in clothing stores, pageant-training, conversations with salespeople, etc…)

spring cleaning?

‘shed’ some ‘stuff’!
Donate clean professional wear and accessories to the Dress For Success (DFS) Organization.  The specific chapter in which we are actively involved is the DFS/Worldwide – West Headquarters.



If you work in the Los Angeles area and would like our assistance picking up items you wish to donate, please contact us with your name, business address, telephone number and email address to schedule an appointment.