“I’m a big girl now”, a message from Katy Perry (imgs)

So you still think style’s just a bunch of fluff?

Katy Perry’s photographs by Jannson in Interview mag beg to differ.

When you’re in the media’s eye and every step you take is scrutinized, publicized and tweeted, it’s tough to create a brand without your audience’s approval and agreement. It could be even harder to break out of your teeny-bopper persona … unless you’ve got the right tools and strategy to to make your desired new message clear.

The photographs of Katy Perry below successfully reposition the celebrity and communicates a clear message. What’s the message???

Take me seriously; I’m a talented and professional performer.

3P

(Blk/Wht Photography by MIKAEL JANSSON)

Happy Mother’s Day, mom!

My taste for fashion and professional clothing is greatly influenced by my mother.
Each morning, I watched her leave the house to run her medium-sized print ad company, VIRGO INC.


Always tailored; always ladylike.

Add some spring to your step … in fancy shoes! (img) #3PCstyle

Great question. (via @RonaldSkelton) #Responsible #Consumerism

Look at the last thing you bought, what problem did it solve, what benefit did you buy?

— Ronald Skelton (@ronaldskelton) May 6, 2012

How much thought do we put into where we spend our time, energy and money? Do you consider how the product in your shopping basket got to your hand? How was it manufactured? Whose idea was it to create this? What was intended when the decision to produce the product was made?

Let us know — do you think it matters???

We encourage you to pause and think about what message you’re helping create each time you make a purchase or decision. What you buy makes a bigger statement than you think — it supports ideas, practices and institutions. Be smart. Choose wisely.

Thanks for stopping by.

All the best,

3P

 

How’s your style? Will it help you reach success? (#3PCstyle)

#3PCstyle details: https://myprettypinkponies.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/3pcstyle.pdf

Join our Twittter/Pinterest conversation with Fashion Designer, Lando Ortega tonight at 6:30 (PT).

Lando provides us with his expert opinion on the following:

  • Does fashion or style matter? Why/Why not?
  • What kind of impact does styling and fashion have on women?
  • How do we dress for who we really are (vs. who we wish to be) – body type, fit, style, fabric, drape…?
Please feel free to interject with follow up questions and thoughts after our guest has responded to the current question. Thank you!!!
3P
New to Twitter chat??? Start here! (Guidelines on participating on Twitter chats)
Resources:
Edith Head's How to Dress for Success
Sasha Charnin Morrison's Secrets of Stylists: An Insider's Guide To Styling The Stars

Can a stylish woman command a country’s military forces??? (Images)

Can a high-ranking woman official expect respect from male counterparts and direct reports while carrying a baby and a D&G bag?

Spain says ‘yes’. This is not new news, but a great example that illustrates how to execute balance while serving as a high-ranking political official:

When Spanish Prime Minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero’s new cabinet members took their oath of office before King Juan Carlos on Monday, one of them, the recently-appointed Defense Minister, stood out from the rest. Literally. Carme Chacón, 37, is not only the first woman to head Spain’s armed forces. She is also seven months pregnant.

Article take from Time.com

ImageImageImageImage

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1730927,00.html#ixzz1s3tSNwKr

The Art of Being Well-dressed: Superfluous or Essential? Both.

Introduction

Some consider the art of dressing, fashion and styling as a superfluous use of one’s time and energy. They’re right. Fashion can be overthought and when combined with the forces of retail marketing, fashion can result in  addiction to consumption.

The Hollywood cliché of the teenage girl’s obsession with her image, shopping with her friends and becoming an over-accessorized one dimensional version of her true potential stems from a very real power fashion magazines, shows and other media have on our values. It can be a limiting existence to live life pursuing an impossible opportunity to become another Kardashian sister.

However, if taken seriously without being obsessively vain, the art of dressing becomes a tool for the sophisticated individual. Fashion – or, in the case of our topic, dressing – is akin to a product’s packaging in that it serves several important roles.

We liken the importance of dressing to the importance of a container; both are extensions of the product itself and both help create a product’s appeal, ensure its preservation, and operates as a means of communication between the brand and its target market.

 

Packaging 101

If you open most books about packaging, you’ll learn that an effective package provides a product with the following:

  1. Containment
  2. Protection
  3. Convenience
  4. Information
  5. Marketing

As a professional possessing valuable skills and talent to offer the world you, too, are a product that needs to be packaged appropriately to appeal to the audience you aim to reach.

Think about it. If a product’s packaging didn’t accurately reflect its contents, how would the buyer react upon discovering that the delicious marshmallows he brought home from the store were instead a package of raw tofu???

Being inappropriately ‘packaged’ will result in disappointments.

 

Proper Packaging: clothing that serves its purpose

So, how exactly do we package ourselves? Glad you asked.

Dressing up or down (or not at all) can be fun. However, when functioning in society, there are responsibilities we must honor before fulfilling our desire to amuse ourselves and do whatever we’d like without regard for rules.

Like a product’s container, our clothing must serve its primary functions before it acts as an extension of our individuality and brand’s message. Typography is useless on a box that doesn’t properly secure the eggs on its way to your kitchen from the grocery store.

In other words your clothes have responsibilites. Your clothing need to fulfill their responsibilities before they can scream, “Louis Vuitton!”.

As a courtesy, we’ve developed a guideline in the form of a checklist to make sure your outfit is at the very least serving its primary purpose.

Checklist: 

1. Containment – Does it sufficiently contain and cover its contents?

2. Protection – Is your outfit appropriate for the environment, weather, social context you’ll be wearing it to? (i.e. flip flops outdoors during a snowstorm, etc…)

3. Convenience – Does your clothing allow you to move comfortably and with ease? Does it fit you properly? Will you have difficulty performing at your optimum level in these clothes?

4. Information – What message does your clothing communicate to society as a whole?

5. Marketing – Are you wearing any symbols or styles that will connect with the specific group you wish to appeal to? Will your market be attracted to you given how you are presented?

(To be continued…)

Confidently “un-pretty”. (images)

Audrey Hepburn
When I worked full time in corporate America, I was always polished and groomed at the office. I worked in an environment where presentation and details made a huge impact on the perception of one’s sense of professionalism.

That said, it was always so refreshing to become “un-pretty” during weekends.

What does it mean to be “un-pretty”? First, let’s take a look at what “pretty” means:

I define ‘pretty’ as being polite, pleasant and polished.  “Pretty” is the very essence of being a lady — coiffed hair, a manicure, a poise presentation, warm, approachable and socially graceful. (Think of a house party’s hostess – friendly and sociable). Someone “pretty” offers you coffee and cookies when you visit their homes. The “pretty” girl tells you how great you look (to simplify the concept); she is concerned about whether or not you’re comfortable and considers what your preferences are.

When I use the term “un-pretty”, I’m not implying that I made an effort to look unattractive (although, a lot of times, this was the case). What I mean is, my style of presentation was less ladylike and lacked the polish and niceties one would expect from a pageant-trained woman.

How does one achieve a “pretty” look?

Feminine make up highlighting the shape of one’s eyes + full lips + groomed brows and hairstyle + polished ready-to-face-the-camera style + tailored and put-togehter – any piece of hair out of place

I love the “un-pretty” side of my closet as much as the polished and tailored pieces I own. It’s necessary, at times, to wear wrinkled shirts, athletic shoes, cotton tees and unruly hair. I say this because I think it’s an advantage to be comfortable even without having to project the socially-constructed version of “girl”. You can be attractive in various ways — wearing pearls and a tiara or sneakers and a baseball cap.

To me, an un-pretty style can convey the gritty sexiness of Marlon Brando’s Stanley Kowalski.

Un-pretty means dressing with style without having to make a lot of effort — in So Cal this laid-back style is one that many non- L.A. natives try very hard to emulate. It’s the confidence in one’s self without having to look like a doll who took two hours to apply make up.

It’s an image that actors and models (who spend their working days in full make-up) naturally have on their days off. A look that conveys the understanding that if they wanted to, they could very well shave their scruff and be as pretty as they come. The “unpretty” girl doesn’t necessarily say ‘please’ or ‘thank you’ in a bubbly voice. She may give you a smirk or a nod of acknowledgement if she’s pleased with you.

Simplified, the “unpretty” girl asks you for a smoke without taking into consideration whether or not you approve of her smoking. She is not as self-conscious as her socially-graceful “pretty” girl counterpart.

How does one achieve this un-pretty too-cool-to-care style?

“undone hair” + cotton tee + element of relaxed or athletic gear – bubbly persona – string of pearls – “matchy-matchy” accessories + grit + attitude…

It’s an image that says, “I’ve got better things to do than try and please everyone I encounter on the street. I’m more than just eye-candy and amusement — I’ve got more important roles to play.” 
I’m sure Sienna Miller (above) is a very pleasant and classy lady. However, I can guarantee that there are probably times when she could care less about what flavor cupcake would make your day. On those days, if you stopped her in the street to chat with her about your exciting new puppy and tell her that it would be really cool to have a picture of you two together, she would somehow let you know that there are other priorities in her day that are a bit more important than hearing your about your puppy’s outfit and how much you’d love to update your Facebook profile picture.
Do you have an “un-pretty” side? How do you celebrate it?
More images of Pretty vs. Un-pretty
Meg@PoniesLLC.com
More:


From Blogger to Intern: Lucy’s fashion internship at NorthSix… (magazine)

Read about a fashion blogger’s internship at a major Fashion Production Agency in
Glossy Magazine Issue 7…

http://static.issuu.com/webembed/viewers/style1/v2/IssuuReader.swf

More Glossy…

Pretty Professional Pumps! (slideshow)

Are you in the market for a pair of everyday office shoes?

For the smart, professional, chic woman who can’t live life without style, below are examples of office-appropriate footwear to inspire confidence as you march into the boardroom to present your brilliant ideas to colleagues.  (No one will know the secret to your spectacular presentation!) Go get ’em!

https://picasaweb.google.com/s/c/bin/slideshow.swf

Here are some other things to keep in mind when shopping for shoes:

Shoe anatomy
How to wear tall boots without looking (post-Halloween)
The rest of your wardrobe: The Fundamentals – “Closet Essentials” post

Interview Suit (image)

Interview Suit

simple.  classic.  no loud jewelry.  don’t forget your stockings.

Interview Suit by prettypinkponies featuring mary jane high heels

Adding to Basics (images)

i was running an errand at my favorite stationery store and had to park my car around the corner.  i was drawn to the interesting aesthetic of a particular store window i hadn’t seen before, and decided to stop in…
although the style seemed familiar (think:  American Apparel), the style of the brand was a bit edgier…more chic.  the store was filled with soft cotton basics in solid colors albeit cut in trendier styles.

while the pieces looked like items one can find in other stores in L.A., the interesting interior design and paintings on the shelves made me curious.  i was greeted by the boutique’s lovely host, miss ashley.  ashley gave me the low-down on the store’s genesis and eventually introduced me to the owner and his family (thanks, ash).


i write about this to point out how easily one can create various “looks” starting with “basic pieces”.  coming straight from a corporate setting, i walked into the store wearing:  a silk cami + sweater, black slacks, pearls, and a pair of black pumps.  by updating my top (read:  throwing something over my cami), i created various styles…with just one piece.
+ classic shirt in navy
+ striped sweater
+ fine cotton hoodie
+ classic shirt + hat
+ light cotton tank
+ kate moss screenprint tank



1.  basics + classic shirt in navy
2.  basics + striped sweater
3.  basics + fine cotton hoodie
4.  basics + classic shirt + hat
5.  basics + light cotton tank

6.  basics + kate moss screenprint tank


thank you jessy, mariam, joy and ashley!!!  this is one of our favorite new stores!!


rodeo drive

may 2011
storefronts on rodeo drive