Would You Survive this Job Interview (video)?

Closet Essentials – Intro. + links

Our closets reflect our identity, our desired identity and the rites of passage we’ve crossed.  They know who we truly are, who we’ve been, and who we desire to become.  Looking in a person’s closet can tell a lot about how much a person has grown and how they’ve developed in a span of time.




With that in mind, our closets often times store items we no longer need, items others will benefit more from, yet lack essential items of dress which are essential to our current lives…

There have been many theories on “what every girl’s closet should have”…from Rachel Zoe, to Nina Garcia. 

The series of posts in this category, “fashion – closet essentials” will help identify what items of wear are essential based on Maslow’s theory of basic human needs (please google this if unfamiliar).  Read on.





“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist








“Closet Essentials” Series:  Intro > Part. I checklist > Part II. / checklist > Part III. / checklist

Youth In The Office – Called out comment (Forbes.com) repost

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert

The article:


“I’m 24. I live in New York City. I hate my job. Of course, I’m not supposed to say that. I’m supposed to feel accomplished to be young and employed and have benefits in this economic environment.


My life is a series of boxes on an assembly line. Today is just another box on my calendar. Every day I shuffle between a city apartment and an office cube, typing into rectangles, sending papers, signing papers, filing papers. What I do is not important. That’s the problem….”



Our response:

 Dear youth in the office: I, too, belong in this group. And, I, too, have felt your frustration. I’ve held various occupations since I was 16, and I’ve pushed paper in Dilbert’s office. I struggle between not feeling on track to achieve my full potential and a reality check. If I may make a suggestion that would provide you with a fresh set of eyes, it would be this: …
Sit in a “real” diner. One that Jonathan Gold would never been interested in visiting. Perhaps one in a struggling small town. Take a seat, look into the kitchen and observe the hourly workers prepare your meal.
Breathing in fumes and lard day after day in hairnets covered in grease…Then observe them when they clean up at the end of the day. Rinsing the kitchen mats, rinsing other people’s food off dishes, mopping the floor (I used to whine about this). Then reflect on your perspective again. Passion about one’s work often comes from being proud of the job you’ve done no matter what type of work you do. Pride in one’s work brings the “joy” you described. Enjoyment in one’s work comes with the sense of ownership you get when you give even the smallest paper-pushing task your absolute best effort while biting your tongue. It comes from feeling like you’ve grown and have crossed a rite of passage. All those people at the top whom I admire and strive to emulate have had to “do the dishes” at some point in their lives. It’s a prerequisite and a rite of passage for anyone on the path to achievement. Best of luck to you. Onward!


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On this post: Youth In The Office: Confessions Of A Fed-Up Employee



@prettypinkpro: "Hire Friday Twitter Chat" (aka #HFChat)…recap by @EmploymentGuide

The quoted dialogue below was gathered by Brandon Lawson (aka @EmploymentGuide) during an online chat on Twitter last week. These weekly discussions are referred to as “HFChats” – for Hire Friday chats. The discussions between job seekers, and HR professionals provide insight to how hiring decisions are made.
We’re glad Brandon found our response worth mentioning on his site. Thanks, Brandon!
05. December 2011 | Show Originial
This past Friday, we took part in another Hire Friday Chat forum on Twitter. If you were not a part of the fun, I’ll bring you up to speed. Our Hire Friday Chat topic was about The Art of Asking Interview Questions, and was hosted by John Kador (@jkador) and Adam Eisenstein (@McGrawHillJobs). This was a very educational forum, explaining why it is important for jobseekers to ask questions during the interview. Here is a recap of the chat’s questions and some of the best answers: 
Q1. Why is it important to ask questions? 
A1: @JanisSpirit: Asking questions shows engagement, involvement and wanting the job. ASK! 
Q2. What kinds of questions are appropriate to ask?
A2: @DavidALee: Ask questions you can’t find answers elsewhere. If its on the website and you ask…Fail!
Q3. Should you save your questions until the end of the interview?
A3: @BrendenMWright: An interview is a conversation, a dialogue. It’s not a cross-examination. Engage!  
Q4. What are the best questions you’ve heard?
A4: @prettypinkpro: What is the leadership like in the organization? What is the leadership like in this particular division? 
A4: 
@comerecommended: That I’ve heard: “How would you define ‘success’ at this position?”
Q5. Should you ask the interviewer for a critique?
A5: @MikePetras: Ask in softer way: What is the next step in the process? Sometimes they’ll tip their hand. 
Q6. Why should you ask for the job?
A6: @ResumeDrEliz: Sure. If you truly want the position, close with a powerful, enthusiastic statement that says just that. 

Employment Guide.com article here

(Thanks for the mention, @EmploymentGuide!)

Regards,

@prettypinkpro