Courage … in fancy high heeled shoes!

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We’re looking forward to co-hosting tonight’s #BEaLEADER Twitterchat as @PrPinkPonies/@PrettyPinkPro and our networks from Meetup.com, Etsy, USC et al…

As you may know, Pretty Pink Ponies has a successful and accomplished team of over 100 small local merchants with online shops.

Here’s our team description:

Continue reading

“I’m a big girl now”, a message from Katy Perry (imgs)

So you still think style’s just a bunch of fluff?

Katy Perry’s photographs by Jannson in Interview mag beg to differ.

When you’re in the media’s eye and every step you take is scrutinized, publicized and tweeted, it’s tough to create a brand without your audience’s approval and agreement. It could be even harder to break out of your teeny-bopper persona … unless you’ve got the right tools and strategy to to make your desired new message clear.

The photographs of Katy Perry below successfully reposition the celebrity and communicates a clear message. What’s the message???

Take me seriously; I’m a talented and professional performer.

3P

(Blk/Wht Photography by MIKAEL JANSSON)

Turn Enemies into Allies (#HBRchat)

[View the story “#HBRchat Topic, April 26: Turn Your Enemies into Allies” on Storify]

more #HBRChats

This will make you smarter > Defining “genius”. (Video)

I often revisit this conversation between Malcolm Gladwell and television journalist, Robert Krulwich where they discuss what defines a “genius”.

This conversation looks at the following topics and questions:

  • Is it “good” to segregate the superstars from the average stars?
  • What makes Tiger “Tiger Woods”?
  • What if it was a rule that we couldn’t ask one another from which university we graduated?
  • What is the “selection effect”?
  • Is our education system “…run like a modeling agency”?

(If you don’t have a flash player, please use this link to view the interview. Thanks for stopping by.)

3P

The Art of Being Well-dressed: Superfluous or Essential? Both.

Introduction

Some consider the art of dressing, fashion and styling as a superfluous use of one’s time and energy. They’re right. Fashion can be overthought and when combined with the forces of retail marketing, fashion can result in  addiction to consumption.

The Hollywood cliché of the teenage girl’s obsession with her image, shopping with her friends and becoming an over-accessorized one dimensional version of her true potential stems from a very real power fashion magazines, shows and other media have on our values. It can be a limiting existence to live life pursuing an impossible opportunity to become another Kardashian sister.

However, if taken seriously without being obsessively vain, the art of dressing becomes a tool for the sophisticated individual. Fashion – or, in the case of our topic, dressing – is akin to a product’s packaging in that it serves several important roles.

We liken the importance of dressing to the importance of a container; both are extensions of the product itself and both help create a product’s appeal, ensure its preservation, and operates as a means of communication between the brand and its target market.

 

Packaging 101

If you open most books about packaging, you’ll learn that an effective package provides a product with the following:

  1. Containment
  2. Protection
  3. Convenience
  4. Information
  5. Marketing

As a professional possessing valuable skills and talent to offer the world you, too, are a product that needs to be packaged appropriately to appeal to the audience you aim to reach.

Think about it. If a product’s packaging didn’t accurately reflect its contents, how would the buyer react upon discovering that the delicious marshmallows he brought home from the store were instead a package of raw tofu???

Being inappropriately ‘packaged’ will result in disappointments.

 

Proper Packaging: clothing that serves its purpose

So, how exactly do we package ourselves? Glad you asked.

Dressing up or down (or not at all) can be fun. However, when functioning in society, there are responsibilities we must honor before fulfilling our desire to amuse ourselves and do whatever we’d like without regard for rules.

Like a product’s container, our clothing must serve its primary functions before it acts as an extension of our individuality and brand’s message. Typography is useless on a box that doesn’t properly secure the eggs on its way to your kitchen from the grocery store.

In other words your clothes have responsibilites. Your clothing need to fulfill their responsibilities before they can scream, “Louis Vuitton!”.

As a courtesy, we’ve developed a guideline in the form of a checklist to make sure your outfit is at the very least serving its primary purpose.

Checklist: 

1. Containment – Does it sufficiently contain and cover its contents?

2. Protection – Is your outfit appropriate for the environment, weather, social context you’ll be wearing it to? (i.e. flip flops outdoors during a snowstorm, etc…)

3. Convenience – Does your clothing allow you to move comfortably and with ease? Does it fit you properly? Will you have difficulty performing at your optimum level in these clothes?

4. Information – What message does your clothing communicate to society as a whole?

5. Marketing – Are you wearing any symbols or styles that will connect with the specific group you wish to appeal to? Will your market be attracted to you given how you are presented?

(To be continued…)

Response to: Gender, Age & Professionalism discussion

I wrote the following earlier this week, but, unfortunately, it looks like it was never posted:

I can’t thank all of you enough for your generous time and willingness to share your professional and wise insight regarding professionalism, age & gender. I recognize that you have no obligation to read this let alone take the time to write such helpful advice. I’m overwhelmed by your support and connection. The lack of clarity between professional men/women’s intentions can create confusion and frustration. Your insight serves everyone – irrespective of gender or other irrelevant classification. I speak for all who read and help write our blogs and sites – Thank you for your help. Social Media would be worthless if not for its ability to effectively and respectfully exchange valuable ideas and perspectives with people…Most especially those who would never have had the “social wherewithal” to receive such helpful insight.

All the best, 3P & associates.

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Thanks to:

Dian
Deborah Thomas
MJS
Deb Babbit (@DebBabbit)
Jeff Rickard
princessscribe
RongHua Ching (@Asiabroadcast)
Joe Passkiewicz
Senecea Jefferson
Bobby Umar
OOC
Dean Guest
AJ Borrowsky
FluidAsbo
Iesley Whyte
ResumeSmith
Nicco
Douglas Park
Seth Carginolo (@carge77)
Laura Hunt (@LauraHuntStyle)
Sally Hanan (@inksnatcher)
moxiecouture
Murhphy Palmer

…and others who continue to read and provide feedback.

Would You Survive this Job Interview (video)?

Pink Ponies Pins! (Pinterest)

vs.

Let’s play dress up on Pinterest!!!
Pink

Ponies
Pins

Charlize Theron CNN interview…(vid)

Charlene Theron encourages embracing the complexity of individuals (specifically women) in the roles she chooses, recounts memories of being dismissed as being ‘too pretty’ to be taken seriously as an actor and how she has come to grips with the reality of her industry – business comes first.

What I did to stay on point for today’s interview…

You know how champion athletes train extensively to
prepare for a competition?  Well,
that’s sorta how I prep for an interview. 
I
try to get in my “flow”.
Why do I think I’m qualified to provide you with
interview pointers?  Here’s some background:


I’ve been working since I was 15 ½ (Gold’s Gym was my
first gig), and I’ve experienced answering controversial questions confidently
with a big smile wearing a bikini and five-inch pumps on stage with girls who
are prettier, taller more “dazzling” than me, et cetera…and I’ve scored better
than they did in interviews. I landed my internship with a cold call. Between
my part-time jobs, volunteer jobs, and full-time work, I’ve probably been
interviewed and sized up by at least 25 hiring managers (and actual judges).
I
can honestly say I’m comfortable during interviews.
While the interview isn’t my weak spot, I’m aware I’ll
be speaking with big-boys (and big-girls) in first-rate companies.  These
companies are not “Mickey-Mouse” organizations; they demand a certain level of
professionalism and respect. If the person you’re interviewing with also
screens executive candidates, then they’re probably pretty good at judging
character. So, don’t B.S. them. A hiring manager isn’t going to be forgiving if
I’m less than par because I said “sorry” in a sweet voice.  These are
professionals with a job to do and my job is to make their job easier by being
prepared, honest and cooperative (unless I don’t want the job).
So,
I bring it.
If you’re a true pro, you understand what’s expected.
At the bare minimum, you must do your homework.
There’s
no such thing as being too prepared – only un
prepared.
Besides, I owe it to myself to behave like a high-level
professional and not like a rookie because that’s who I am. Also, recruiters
and managers are less forgiving about my small mistakes because I have years of
experience and they expect me to know better. And, they’re right!  Step up
or get off the plate!
How:
What’s your homework? An understanding of the
organization, its history, values and culture. And, more importantly, an
understanding of the job you’re being considered for. You might think this is
inconsequential because you’ll be learning about the company from the
recruiter, but trust me, they notice and they appreciate someone who takes
initiative. Not only that, but jumping into an organization without
understanding what the culture is like is just plain silly. 
If
your values don’t align with the people you work with, you’ll never advance in
the long run at that place.
I do my research on the person with whom I’m
interviewing as well as the company itself. I also have a checklist that I
complete before the actual interview. Within this checklist is a rating system
to gauge how much I truly want the job with the company.
This
is a two-way street afterall, and I’m interviewing companies just as much as
they’re interviewing me.
I have tons of experience and a lot of talent to offer,
and I’m not willing to settle for a something that is not a good fit. Also,
there’s no way I can single-handedly change the culture of an organization to
suit my style no matter how much passion or tenacity or drive I possess. 
I
know my weaknesses.
Knowing that a good fit is vital to my career
trajectory in the long-run, I have to first understand what I want from an
employer then be honest about whether they are willing to and have the ability
to provide these things for me. 
Keep
in mind: this is a negotiation.
If I accept the job, I’m making a commitment to do my
absolute best to provide the company with as much value as I can in the manner
by which I’m able and within the context of my formal role. By accepting a job
offer,
I’m
obligated to do what’s expected.
Not the very minimum.  Not what I can get away
with. I’m in it all the way. It’s a big deal and a formal commitment. And,
because I take what they asked of me seriously, I expect their investment in me
as well. I call this, “healthy relationship”. This reminds me of what my friend
tells his three-year old when she doesn’t want to do something she’s supposed
to,
“You
wanna be a big girl?  Then, act like a big girl.”
Mind you, I’m not always a big girl. Sometimes I get
lazy. Other times I’m tired, or immature. I find it tough to be on point 24/7. 
I like being goofy at times. And, I appreciate the different roles I have in
life. However, when the situation calls for it, I come through. I have to. Not
behaving like a ‘big girl’ during situations that call for maturity and
commitment cause major problems.  Stay on point.

(BTW, I got a second call back and booked a second
interview immediately after the first interview today.  The proof is in
the pudding. =) 

The Next Great Generation (Twitter chat)

Below is a recap of a recent Twitter Chat with TheNextGreatGeneration.com (@NextGreatGen).

Thanks, TNGG for hosting this chat regarding Gen Y and what we think about the current job market.  Below are our feedback and suggestions and the link to the original article on the TNGG’s site.

Thanks, TNGG!

3P

Link to article on TNGG

Interview Suit (image)

Interview Suit

simple.  classic.  no loud jewelry.  don’t forget your stockings.

Interview Suit by prettypinkponies featuring mary jane high heels