Nov. 26th is Shop Small Saturday!


Today is “Shop Small Saturday”! We love the charm of small stores and restaurants (some of which have been around since we were kids!).


We’ve literally met and spent time getting to know the owners and shop keepers of the above-listed stores and are impressed with their vision, persistence and professionalism. (See our reviews on Yelp!)



These hard-working “store keepers” and their teams provide the best selection of carefully chosen products,  and amazing customer service. A genuine overall experience!

We look forward to shopping today!

SUPPORT SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY®

The 2nd annual Small Business Saturday® is
a day dedicated to supporting small businesses
on one of the busiest shopping weekends of the year.
On November 26, we’re asking millions of people to Shop Small at their favorite local stores and help fuel the economy. When we all shop small, it will be huge.

PLEDGE TO SHOP SMALL ON NOV 26

(Read more about Small Business Saturday here)

Youth In The Office: Fed-Up! (Forbes article)

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert

The article:


“I’m 24. I live in New York City. I hate my job. Of course, I’m not supposed to say that. I’m supposed to feel accomplished to be young and employed and have benefits in this economic environment.


My life is a series of boxes on an assembly line. Today is just another box on my calendar. Every day I shuffle between a city apartment and an office cube, typing into rectangles, sending papers, signing papers, filing papers. What I do is not important. That’s the problem….”



Our response:

 Dear youth in the office: I, too, belong in this group. And, I, too, have felt your frustration. I’ve held various occupations since I was 16, and I’ve pushed paper in Dilbert’s office. I struggle between not feeling on track to achieve my full potential and a reality check. If I may make a suggestion that would provide you with a fresh set of eyes, it would be this: …
Sit in a “real” diner. One that Jonathan Gold would never been interested in visiting. Perhaps one in a struggling small town. Take a seat, look into the kitchen and observe the hourly workers prepare your meal.
Breathing in fumes and lard day after day in hairnets covered in grease…Then observe them when they clean up at the end of the day. Rinsing the kitchen mats, rinsing other people’s food off dishes, mopping the floor (I used to whine about this). Then reflect on your perspective again. Passion about one’s work often comes from being proud of the job you’ve done no matter what type of work you do. Pride in one’s work brings the “joy” you described. Enjoyment in one’s work comes with the sense of ownership you get when you give even the smallest paper-pushing task your absolute best effort while biting your tongue. It comes from feeling like you’ve grown and have crossed a rite of passage. All those people at the top whom I admire and strive to emulate have had to “do the dishes” at some point in their lives. It’s a prerequisite and a rite of passage for anyone on the path to achievement. Best of luck to you. Onward!


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On this post: Youth In The Office: Confessions Of A Fed-Up Employee


L.A.’s Fashion Identity

L.A. Weekly recently asked “Does L.A. have a fashion identity?”.   
Gendy Alimurung’s article supported the notion that L.A. is “behind” when it comes to fashion.  

Yet strangely, Los Angeles is not a town for high fashion, for $5,000
head-to-toe designer outfits. “We’re behind a little,” Cota admits. “Or
we don’t pay attention. Fashion Week in L.A. is not the strongest. It’s
not a priority.”

We disagree wholeheartedly.

There are many [mainstream] styles distinctly “L.A.” (that is, styles organically-raised by subcultures “born” in our town).  Those who contributed to the article seem to have been too busy to watch L.A. “looks” go from underground  to boutique to mainstream Wal-Mart.

In this case, the quote above was coming from the perspective of a designer/business-owner who is more likely speaking to the popularity of fashion and style in terms of business revenue.  “Style” in L.A. doesn’t always generate revenue for store-owners because not all L.A. socialites (unlike their East Coast counterparts) necessarily feel required to carry luxury-brand handbags to gain admission into exclusive social circles.  Some do.  However, others use some form of “cultural and/or social currency” (more on this topic of “cool” later) to “belong”.  It’s less likely for an L.A. socialite to be dismissed for not having blood ties to Andrew Carnegie.  Thus, display of “old money” is less relevant to become popular in this town.

That doesn’t mean “L.A. is behind”, Mr. Cota.  It just means we can use many alternatives to luxury brand clothing and accessories to demonstrate to others just how “cool” we are.


There’s certainly a backlash from all the unkempt and boho looks
perpetuated by non-L.A. folk which drive more and more Los Angeles
denizens to adopt tailored and manicured self-images just to counter the
stupidity of wearing $500-dollar printed Hanes cotton Tees marketed as
“vintage”.

L.A./So Cal is the birthplace of many now-mainstream-trends. Love ’em or hate ’em, here are a few distinct “L.A. styles” (among many others):

1) Chucks – “..The Mexican kids doing the…rockabily thing…” you
mention in your article above helped bring popularity to Converse’s
Chuck Taylors. Once only worn by “greasers”, these ‘played-out’ shoes
(in various patterns and flavors sold by shark-y Nordstrom salesfolk)
seen even on midwestern homecoming queen L.A. transplants were
popularized, if not born, here.

2) Graffiti prints – popularized
by Stussy, a retail brand which originated in the 80’s from Laguna Beach
became universally popular for its graffiti-inspired shirts. This
version of “cool” or “urban” – incorporating nuances from
skaters/surfers – was quite distinct from the NYC’s definition of
“urban” (read: hip-hop). The grafffiti/”bombing” style print was
exclusive to “L.A. identity” during the 90’s.

3) Terry cloth
loungewear (a la Juicy Couture)
– (image below) as hideous as they are (terry cloth
tracksuits + Ugg Boot combos) were born and raised in So Cal (read:
please blame Orange County). I went to USC and my girlfriends and I had nightmares about velour tracksuits even years after college (Thanks, Greek Row).  I’m not proud of the “I’m-gonna-wear-my-GOOD-sweats” look, however, it is
distinctly “L.A.” (if by “L.A.” you mean trends not associated with NYC
or other large metropolitan cities).

Lastly,
trust-fund-bohemian-types who labor to achieve the “…nonconspicuous
conspicuous consumption…”
I’m-not-vain-and-it’s-my-job-to-judge-those-who-blindly-consume-and-obviously-take-pride-in-their-physical-appearance
are the most unoriginal, self-righteous judgemental L.A.
transplant-types. (Totally non-sequitir, but I needed to vent).



meg@myprettypinkponies.com,
the girl who conspicuously consumes (and isn’t ashamed of it)
fin 

the worst gang in Los Angeles
Other good & bad popular (or, once-popular) “looks” originating in Los Angeles:
  1. Michael Stars and the comfortable yet fashionably sexy tee (no smelly bohos here).
  2. Baywatch and the tan, fit and “shapely” physique (medically-enhanced).
  3. (tbc..)





Sources: