Boyfriends w/ D1 backgrounds = better relationships (teams)

“How do you manage people who are better than you?”

There Is An I In Team: HBR Presentation w/ Mark De Rond and Angela Herrin
Marvel comics, team, Xmen

Marvel comics, team, Xmen

I listened to a recent web presentation provided by the Harvard Business Review titled, “There Is An I In Team”.

I’m fascinated by collaboration among team members as a result of having had a couple of long term boyfriends who played Division I sports (Hot!).

It made very little sense to me in college that men can experience anger and frustration with a teammate or rival, duke it out, then grab a beer and hang out as friends the following day.

They seemed to be able to separate their roles on their teams from who they are off the team. But, how?!?!?

These abilities — a) getting over setbacks and moving forward, and b) separating one’s role on and off his/her team — are paramount to one’s chances of success in large organizations (i.e. Professor Xavier’s school for the gifted, or if you prefer reality, large world class corporations).

Marvel comics, team, Xmen

The HBR presentation I mentioned  is one of the better studies on how the best teams function, what makes teams effective, and how to manage teams to accomplish wins. De Rond takes his observations of university rowing teams and boat races to examine coordination between team members.

One insightful observation De Rond discovered in the results of team surveys is that high performers typically underestimate their own teammates**. And, as we all have experienced, this makes high performers or those who are highly intelligent dismissive of others.

If this is true, what can we do to exploit the value high performers can provide while mitigating the risks these high performers’ behavioral tendencies often cause?

Surprisingly, the answer isn’t found by forcing all team members to get along. It turns out that expressing emotional experiences and venting to teammates create winning performance***.

While most of us define team harmony as an absence of competitiveness between members, this is only half of the story. Competition (“lack of harmony”) cannot truly be forced out of individuals because it is innate. If suppressed, competition resurfaces in more destructive forms under the radar of team leaders and creates more dysfunction than if they were acknowledged, accepted and resolved in a psychologically safe and moderated space.

My favorite take away from this presentation is this: 

Harmony cannot be forced in teams. Harmony is created naturally when teams experience wins and achieve great things through collaboration with one another.

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12 Business Lessons from a One-Woman-Show (guest post)

MyBohemianSummer from MyBohemianSummer saysHighlighted Post

The biggest thing that I have learned so far in the hand made business is to not take it personal. This is very hard for me, and for a lot of artists and crafters that I know, because what we do is personal. This is from an article that I read a couple of months ago, and I keep it handy to refresh myself when it is needed. Like a good swift kick in the pants. (christinekane.com/how-to-not-take-things-personally-a-practical-guide) Here are some tips that I love passing on since it is so relevant to us and what we do:

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“I’m a big girl now”, a message from Katy Perry (imgs)

So you still think style’s just a bunch of fluff?

Katy Perry’s photographs by Jannson in Interview mag beg to differ.

When you’re in the media’s eye and every step you take is scrutinized, publicized and tweeted, it’s tough to create a brand without your audience’s approval and agreement. It could be even harder to break out of your teeny-bopper persona … unless you’ve got the right tools and strategy to to make your desired new message clear.

The photographs of Katy Perry below successfully reposition the celebrity and communicates a clear message. What’s the message???

Take me seriously; I’m a talented and professional performer.

3P

(Blk/Wht Photography by MIKAEL JANSSON)

Happy Mother’s Day, mom!

My taste for fashion and professional clothing is greatly influenced by my mother.
Each morning, I watched her leave the house to run her medium-sized print ad company, VIRGO INC.


Always tailored; always ladylike.

Great question. (via @RonaldSkelton) #Responsible #Consumerism

Look at the last thing you bought, what problem did it solve, what benefit did you buy?

— Ronald Skelton (@ronaldskelton) May 6, 2012

How much thought do we put into where we spend our time, energy and money? Do you consider how the product in your shopping basket got to your hand? How was it manufactured? Whose idea was it to create this? What was intended when the decision to produce the product was made?

Let us know — do you think it matters???

We encourage you to pause and think about what message you’re helping create each time you make a purchase or decision. What you buy makes a bigger statement than you think — it supports ideas, practices and institutions. Be smart. Choose wisely.

Thanks for stopping by.

All the best,

3P

 

Funny…

 

This will make you smarter > Defining “genius”. (Video)

I often revisit this conversation between Malcolm Gladwell and television journalist, Robert Krulwich where they discuss what defines a “genius”.

This conversation looks at the following topics and questions:

  • Is it “good” to segregate the superstars from the average stars?
  • What makes Tiger “Tiger Woods”?
  • What if it was a rule that we couldn’t ask one another from which university we graduated?
  • What is the “selection effect”?
  • Is our education system “…run like a modeling agency”?

(If you don’t have a flash player, please use this link to view the interview. Thanks for stopping by.)

3P

How to improve your A-Game (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar).

You were known as a focused player who wasn’t very personable. Did that hurt your career?

Well, it had a negative effect on how I was portrayed. But I had no one to explain the value of public relations to me. When I was in college, there was such an intense demand from the press that John Wooden said they couldn’t talk to me at all. So that was what I took for normal going into the NBA. Being at the top of my game and working as hard as I could for the people who employed me—that was my primary focus, and everything else was secondary. So I didn’t always respond to social situations in a pleasant way. When it came to talking to people, I was kind of reserved. But shyness is something you have to overcome. Later in my career, I started doing a lot better relating to fans and talking to the media. I think that’s continued to improve in my retirement.

Excellent interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Harvard Business Review. This interview highlights elements of success and transcends industries beyond sports. We continue to explore lessons from athletes on tonight’s #3PChat with @RickardonSports. Please follow and ask questions using “#3PCwin”. Thank you.

This interview discusses:

  • Why PR matters in addition to your team’s results.
  • What role managers play in development.
  • Being multi-dimensional
  • How to play with Magic.
  • How being described as “difficult” hurts your game.
  • Improvement in general.
  • Being accessible.
  • How to market and sell yourself.
  • Good-judgment.
  • Et cetera…

We highly recommend this interview with Kareem as he reflects on his trajectory as he evolved from a great player to a winning player on and off court:

Life’s Work: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar – Harvard Business Review.

The Art of Being Well-dressed: Superfluous or Essential? Both.

Introduction

Some consider the art of dressing, fashion and styling as a superfluous use of one’s time and energy. They’re right. Fashion can be overthought and when combined with the forces of retail marketing, fashion can result in  addiction to consumption.

The Hollywood cliché of the teenage girl’s obsession with her image, shopping with her friends and becoming an over-accessorized one dimensional version of her true potential stems from a very real power fashion magazines, shows and other media have on our values. It can be a limiting existence to live life pursuing an impossible opportunity to become another Kardashian sister.

However, if taken seriously without being obsessively vain, the art of dressing becomes a tool for the sophisticated individual. Fashion – or, in the case of our topic, dressing – is akin to a product’s packaging in that it serves several important roles.

We liken the importance of dressing to the importance of a container; both are extensions of the product itself and both help create a product’s appeal, ensure its preservation, and operates as a means of communication between the brand and its target market.

 

Packaging 101

If you open most books about packaging, you’ll learn that an effective package provides a product with the following:

  1. Containment
  2. Protection
  3. Convenience
  4. Information
  5. Marketing

As a professional possessing valuable skills and talent to offer the world you, too, are a product that needs to be packaged appropriately to appeal to the audience you aim to reach.

Think about it. If a product’s packaging didn’t accurately reflect its contents, how would the buyer react upon discovering that the delicious marshmallows he brought home from the store were instead a package of raw tofu???

Being inappropriately ‘packaged’ will result in disappointments.

 

Proper Packaging: clothing that serves its purpose

So, how exactly do we package ourselves? Glad you asked.

Dressing up or down (or not at all) can be fun. However, when functioning in society, there are responsibilities we must honor before fulfilling our desire to amuse ourselves and do whatever we’d like without regard for rules.

Like a product’s container, our clothing must serve its primary functions before it acts as an extension of our individuality and brand’s message. Typography is useless on a box that doesn’t properly secure the eggs on its way to your kitchen from the grocery store.

In other words your clothes have responsibilites. Your clothing need to fulfill their responsibilities before they can scream, “Louis Vuitton!”.

As a courtesy, we’ve developed a guideline in the form of a checklist to make sure your outfit is at the very least serving its primary purpose.

Checklist: 

1. Containment – Does it sufficiently contain and cover its contents?

2. Protection – Is your outfit appropriate for the environment, weather, social context you’ll be wearing it to? (i.e. flip flops outdoors during a snowstorm, etc…)

3. Convenience – Does your clothing allow you to move comfortably and with ease? Does it fit you properly? Will you have difficulty performing at your optimum level in these clothes?

4. Information – What message does your clothing communicate to society as a whole?

5. Marketing – Are you wearing any symbols or styles that will connect with the specific group you wish to appeal to? Will your market be attracted to you given how you are presented?

(To be continued…)

How’s YOUR day goin’??

I have the worst headache today.

Ever feel like there’s way too much to think about all at once?!?!?  Well you’re not the only one, sister!!!

Sometimes…It’s just one  of those days and that’s just that! I think I’ll just sit still, close my eyes and breathe…

All the best,

Meg

Kindness isn’t always sweet…

Know what occurred to me earlier? Kindness isn’t always expressed in a pleasant sounding voice. Sometimes it’s disappointing when someone makes a decision that’s for our own best interest.

Can I Be Fully Me?: Stages of Relational Development

“…it takes thirty years to mature emotionally,…”

via Can I Be Fully Me?: Stages of Relational Development.

Confidently “un-pretty”. (images)

Audrey Hepburn
When I worked full time in corporate America, I was always polished and groomed at the office. I worked in an environment where presentation and details made a huge impact on the perception of one’s sense of professionalism.

That said, it was always so refreshing to become “un-pretty” during weekends.

What does it mean to be “un-pretty”? First, let’s take a look at what “pretty” means:

I define ‘pretty’ as being polite, pleasant and polished.  “Pretty” is the very essence of being a lady — coiffed hair, a manicure, a poise presentation, warm, approachable and socially graceful. (Think of a house party’s hostess – friendly and sociable). Someone “pretty” offers you coffee and cookies when you visit their homes. The “pretty” girl tells you how great you look (to simplify the concept); she is concerned about whether or not you’re comfortable and considers what your preferences are.

When I use the term “un-pretty”, I’m not implying that I made an effort to look unattractive (although, a lot of times, this was the case). What I mean is, my style of presentation was less ladylike and lacked the polish and niceties one would expect from a pageant-trained woman.

How does one achieve a “pretty” look?

Feminine make up highlighting the shape of one’s eyes + full lips + groomed brows and hairstyle + polished ready-to-face-the-camera style + tailored and put-togehter – any piece of hair out of place

I love the “un-pretty” side of my closet as much as the polished and tailored pieces I own. It’s necessary, at times, to wear wrinkled shirts, athletic shoes, cotton tees and unruly hair. I say this because I think it’s an advantage to be comfortable even without having to project the socially-constructed version of “girl”. You can be attractive in various ways — wearing pearls and a tiara or sneakers and a baseball cap.

To me, an un-pretty style can convey the gritty sexiness of Marlon Brando’s Stanley Kowalski.

Un-pretty means dressing with style without having to make a lot of effort — in So Cal this laid-back style is one that many non- L.A. natives try very hard to emulate. It’s the confidence in one’s self without having to look like a doll who took two hours to apply make up.

It’s an image that actors and models (who spend their working days in full make-up) naturally have on their days off. A look that conveys the understanding that if they wanted to, they could very well shave their scruff and be as pretty as they come. The “unpretty” girl doesn’t necessarily say ‘please’ or ‘thank you’ in a bubbly voice. She may give you a smirk or a nod of acknowledgement if she’s pleased with you.

Simplified, the “unpretty” girl asks you for a smoke without taking into consideration whether or not you approve of her smoking. She is not as self-conscious as her socially-graceful “pretty” girl counterpart.

How does one achieve this un-pretty too-cool-to-care style?

“undone hair” + cotton tee + element of relaxed or athletic gear – bubbly persona – string of pearls – “matchy-matchy” accessories + grit + attitude…

It’s an image that says, “I’ve got better things to do than try and please everyone I encounter on the street. I’m more than just eye-candy and amusement — I’ve got more important roles to play.” 
I’m sure Sienna Miller (above) is a very pleasant and classy lady. However, I can guarantee that there are probably times when she could care less about what flavor cupcake would make your day. On those days, if you stopped her in the street to chat with her about your exciting new puppy and tell her that it would be really cool to have a picture of you two together, she would somehow let you know that there are other priorities in her day that are a bit more important than hearing your about your puppy’s outfit and how much you’d love to update your Facebook profile picture.
Do you have an “un-pretty” side? How do you celebrate it?
More images of Pretty vs. Un-pretty
Meg@PoniesLLC.com
More:


You WILL stumble…

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Women In Business (Infographic)

Courtesy of MBA Online Program.com

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“Losing friends” to adulthood…

Image

girlfriends

“I’m pregnant”, she happily delivers in a text message. Continue reading

::: The Bank of Life by Emily Post :::

THE BANK OF LIFE

Life, whether social or business, is a bank in which you deposit certain funds of character, intellect and heart; Continue reading

Today’s BIG goal…

To walk confidently, albeit humbly…





…in fancy high-heeled shoes.


Sincerely,
Meg

"Fallen Princesses" by Dina Goldstein – a favorite post

Amazing work by Dina Goldstein, “Fallen Princesses” examines the untold story of princesses lives after the happily ever-after.

These works place Fairy Tale characters in modern day scenarios. In all of the images the Princess is placed in an environment that articulates her conflict. The ‘…happily ever after’ is replaced with a realistic outcome and addresses current issues… Disney’s perfect Princesses [are] juxtaposed with real issues that were affecting women around me, such as illness, addiction and self-image issues.

Famous photographer, Annie Leibovitz, is also credited for her beautiful work photographing celebrities as Disney Princesses.  Let’s examine the different messages their images convey:

Snow White courtesy of Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz (Rachel Weisz)

Ariel by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz 

Cinderella by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

What an impactful way to reveal the “other side” of the sought-after-fairy-tale-lives we imagined as girls.   I am a girly-girl, however, it’s important to have a reality check once-in-a-while.

Dina Goldstein’s photographs serve just that purpose – and well.  What a force to counteract the ever-so-influential princess cartoons children are exposed to.

Belle by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)
by Annie Leibovitz (Penelope Cruz as Belle)

Pocahontas by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz (Jessica Biel as Pocahontas)
The Disney Princesses

Do well in school, young ladies!!!

3P

Do You Rank People According To Their Net Worth???

…Then, you’re probably no friend of mine.
Source: waveavenue.com via Tim on Pinterest

Friendship "Break Ups": Thoughts by Lauren

By LAUREN STEWART


Recently, I had a friend ignore me for months because she “needed a break from friendships” because of her busy schedule and life. I completely understand how busy people can be and how friendships can take a beating because you simply don’t have time. But I personally think that you have to take the time to maintain friendships, no matter what. Friendship is one of the best things about life, so why take it for granted?


1. Schedule friend time like you schedule your appointments. Even at your busiest, when you see something in your schedule or calendar, you know it has to be done. Sometimes, you may not feel like hanging out with friends when there are a million things to be done, but once you’re there and having fun, you’ll realize how much you needed that time to recharge.


2. Don’t make blowing off someone a habit. Most people are pretty understanding if someone has to cancel a friend date because of work, illness, or an emergency. But if you make a habit of cancelling plans and blowing people off… unfortunately, you’re sure to be friendless in no time.


3. Take the time to do nice things for your friends, even if they live far away and you don’t see them often. Make sure you talk on the phone, Skype, send notes on Facebook, pay for lunch every once in a while… the little things that mean a lot in friendships. 

4. Be available. Often times, you really need your friends when something happens. Be available via phone, text, whatever and drop everything if a friend really needs you.


5. Reevaluate friendships and realize everyone makes mistakes. You will get busy and put off calling that friend and your friends may do the same with you. Small problems can always get worked out. But big problems, like when you feel like your friend doesn’t care about you anymore and they won’t talk about it, it may be time to let go of that friendship. Trust your gut.





About Lauren:
Lauren is a fellow Gen.Y blogger and a recent college graduate with a degree from Oakland University in Journalism. Lauren contributes her writing to blogs, social media, online magazines and sites and provides insight to the lives of Twenty Somethings (Gen Y). We appreciate Lauren’s maturity and contributions to 3P and follow her advice. 


You, too, can follow Lauren here:
http://askinyourface.com/
lauren@myprettypinkponies.com
@lrstewar

Improve Your Productivity by Scheduling Distraction-Free Time

Improve Your Productivity by Scheduling Distraction-Free Time:
Having quality time without distractions goes hand in hand with maximizing your productivity. One method which I love is the idea of scheduling in distraction-free time.


Photo credit: mag3737
The idea is to have scheduled blocks of the day which are allocated to getting away from distractions. This is similar to the pomodoro technique but less structured and with potentially larger chunks of time depending on the project. This is distraction free period of time focused on working, free of all the distractions. For example, I had a friend who regularly scheduled in “Talk to the hand!” time in their calendar.

Tips for Establishing Distraction-Free Time

Put it in your schedule. Make sure you have this down-time blocked off on your schedule. You always have something to look forward to, and it’s dedicated time to take a break and relax.
Turn off your distractions. Turn off your email reminders, close your calendar, and mute your phone. Try to get away from it as much as you can. Sometimes, I’ll even unplug my laptop and find a quiet place to work or just print off papers to review if I can.
Focus on a specific objective. Trying to do too much at one time can often introduce new potential distractions. If you can, assign one project or objective for the productive time that you’ve scheduled.
Build in time for planning instead of doing. At the beginning of the day, spend time planning what your schedule will be. Review your daily agenda, and find large pockets of time that you can block off for productive time.
Don’t forget down-time. Make time for yourself. Consider scheduling in down-time, as well, to make sure you have plenty of time to take care of all the other things. Or, just take to take a walk to clear your mind!
How do you stay productive throughout the day?

source:
http://connectedhq.com/blog/2011/09/16/improve-your-productivity-by-scheduling-distraction-free-time/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+connected-hq+%28Connected+Life%29

Hobbies that keep you relevant (images)


Embrace the robocalypse!
While you may not associate the activities below with traditional business-folk-type of activities (read:  Jack Welch doesn’t “do” web design), there are important correlations between the skills in employees employers find valuable and these not-so-typical hobbies…



1.Web Design: What competitive company doesn’t have or want an amazing website?  Online sites are the medium of communication of the future  yesterday. 
2.Blogging and Journaling: Aside from the obvious health benefits of writing in a journal (stress reducer), writing and blogging only helps improve your writing and thinking.  If you recognize the importance  of being an effective communicator and having “voice flexibility” (business format, web format, stage format, et cetera…), you would certainly find writing exercises one way to help with this…how do I know?  From my own improvement:  I already write better now than I did at 4:45am today.
3.Reading:  Specifically, our blog… (Do I need to justify this?)


essie@myprettypinkponies.com





How Facebook Posts Affect Your Job Hunt (image)

Survey question:  Have you ever rejected a candidate because of what you saw about them on a social networking site?


(survey below)


Below is part of an article published on TheAtlantic.Com

What are your thoughts?






Youth In The Office: Fed-Up! (Forbes article)

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert

The article:


“I’m 24. I live in New York City. I hate my job. Of course, I’m not supposed to say that. I’m supposed to feel accomplished to be young and employed and have benefits in this economic environment.


My life is a series of boxes on an assembly line. Today is just another box on my calendar. Every day I shuffle between a city apartment and an office cube, typing into rectangles, sending papers, signing papers, filing papers. What I do is not important. That’s the problem….”



Our response:

 Dear youth in the office: I, too, belong in this group. And, I, too, have felt your frustration. I’ve held various occupations since I was 16, and I’ve pushed paper in Dilbert’s office. I struggle between not feeling on track to achieve my full potential and a reality check. If I may make a suggestion that would provide you with a fresh set of eyes, it would be this: …
Sit in a “real” diner. One that Jonathan Gold would never been interested in visiting. Perhaps one in a struggling small town. Take a seat, look into the kitchen and observe the hourly workers prepare your meal.
Breathing in fumes and lard day after day in hairnets covered in grease…Then observe them when they clean up at the end of the day. Rinsing the kitchen mats, rinsing other people’s food off dishes, mopping the floor (I used to whine about this). Then reflect on your perspective again. Passion about one’s work often comes from being proud of the job you’ve done no matter what type of work you do. Pride in one’s work brings the “joy” you described. Enjoyment in one’s work comes with the sense of ownership you get when you give even the smallest paper-pushing task your absolute best effort while biting your tongue. It comes from feeling like you’ve grown and have crossed a rite of passage. All those people at the top whom I admire and strive to emulate have had to “do the dishes” at some point in their lives. It’s a prerequisite and a rite of passage for anyone on the path to achievement. Best of luck to you. Onward!


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Your comment was called out!


On this post: Youth In The Office: Confessions Of A Fed-Up Employee


Food for thought…

…in other words, “have some perspective!”.  There are much more important things in life than your job.  Take care of those priorities, too.

"Fallen Princesses" by Dina Goldstein

Amazing work by Dina Goldstein, “Fallen Princesses” examines the untold story of princesses lives after the happily ever-after.

These works place Fairy Tale characters in modern day scenarios. In all of the images the Princess is placed in an environment that articulates her conflict. The ‘…happily ever after’ is replaced with a realistic outcome and addresses current issues… Disney’s perfect Princesses [are] juxtaposed with real issues that were affecting women around me, such as illness, addiction and self-image issues.

Famous photographer, Annie Leibovitz, is also credited for her beautiful work photographing celebrities as Disney Princesses.  Let’s examine the different messages their images convey:

Snow White courtesy of Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz (Rachel Weisz)

Ariel by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz 

Cinderella by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

What an impactful way to reveal the “other side” of the sought-after-fairy-tale-lives we imagined as girls.   I am a girly-girl, however, it’s important to have a reality check once-in-a-while.

Dina Goldstein’s photographs serve just that purpose – and well.  What a force to counteract the ever-so-influential princess cartoons children are exposed to.

Belle by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)
by Annie Leibovitz (Penelope Cruz as Belle)

Pocahontas by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz (Jessica Biel as Pocahontas)
The Disney Princesses

Do well in school, young ladies!!!

3P

"Seven Lessons To Learn From A Market Downturn"

Our response to Forbes’ article, “Seven Lessons To Learn From A Market Downturn“, is that the average investor would be silly to discount the training and resources professional money managers have had as “irrelevant”
while simultaneously being overconfident about their own investment strategies (especially if their primary source is the latest tip in a money magazine or a “hunch”).  We agree and applaud “Investopedia” for reminding us to “diversify”, consider asset allocation, do our own research and get a second, third, or fifth opinion from reliable sources of information.  More education is always better than less.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – –
Below is a response to this article.

Great article.

Lesson #1: Don’t depend on the stock market to “make” money.

I suppose because we (society/pop-culture) tend to associate the wealthy with their financially-savvy ways (and, top hats), we also often think that the wealthy got there by betting money in the market. Afterall, stocks, bonds and other market-traded investment instruments are used by wealthy people instead of regular ol’ bank accounts. Right?

What’s misleading is that the wealthy don’t need a 100% return nor do they expect it. Athough all investors hope to make huge returns in the market, “wealthy investors” (those with > millions in investable assets) are primarily concerned with:

a) having their overall portfolio perform better than the market;
b) PRESERVING the wealth they worked hard to achieve (for future generations); and
c) the appropriate investment vehicles for their tax-bracket
d) …other reasons…

That said, please note there’s a difference between buying ten shares of a company you know little about because your brother’s friend’s dad’s sister’s mailman had a hunch.

The information-age has led us to believe that the availability of information will help us make huge returns in the stock market. Being intelligent in another field, and supplementing your intelligence by picking up a “dummies” book on options strategies is not a worthwhile investment strategy.

There are multiple factors each money manager/registered representative considers when developing investment strategies. Not to mention it’s their job to watch the market night and day (sometimes even while they sleep).

Unless you – the non-investment professional – can dedicate as much time in researching the markets as trained and educated analysts whose jobs are to research companies, industries, the economy, regulations, tax laws, et cetera…, (not to mention having access to people on the trading desk floors, technology, and many staff members who have immediate access to all necessary information immediately), please don’t make the mistake in assuming you’re as qualified as an experienced investment professional in selecting investments that optimize the upside while limiting the downside. 

Yes, you may get lucky and outperform Warren Buffet on one particular day, but cash-in while you’re ahead. Using the stock market to “make money” is a short-term strategy that relies mostly on luck and the market’s “mood” that day.

**Don’t feel pressured to know about the “coolest” and “sexiest” investment strategies.  Keep in mind that Wall Street is only a movie and Michael Douglas probably hires someone to manage his money for him.  Buying into the idea that you can attain wealth because you’re a better human-being than Joe-Schmoe-Stockbroker is akin to believing you can attain wealth by donning a Top Hat and a monocle.**


Older posts:
What to wear when you’re ‘bullish’ 



2 ways to deal with job-loss

There are a few ways young women might deal with recent job-loss.  Two of those ways are expressed in the links below:

A)  This articles discusses productive steps to take to make yourself relevant and competitive in the job market.

B)  This insightful article discusses the links between young women, job-loss and depression.

There’s no right or wrong way to feel about losing your job.  However, if your depression persists and debilitates your ability to find employment opportunities, please find some support and seek guidance from a counselor, therapist or other professionally-trained person who can provide you with helpful solutions.

3P

Another link you might like:  “There are no such things as good or bad days.”

irritated??? (images)

Stressed?
Frustrated because some people just don’t “get it”?  Put your boxing gloves down.  No need to break a nail over some things.

We get it.  When we’re busy and under a lot of stress, we get into tons of petty fights with others.  Since this isn’t productive and only adds further stress in our lives, we decided we’d figure out how to prevent from turning mild situations into ‘pi$$ing contest$’ with those we interact with.  Even if you’re a pissing-contest-champion, winning pointless arguments rarely ever helps anyone move closer to their long-term goals.

VOGUE (TURKEY), June 2011

One way to prevent unnecessary stress is to improve communication.

For instance, before getting upset with others, see if you can communicate what you need effectively and in a manner the other person can understand clearly.

An article published by the Mayo Clinic (below) observes behaviors leading to stress and frustration in relationships.  The article suggests preventing conflict by communicating your needs assertively without making the other person feel attacked.

As it turns out, people don’t usually care to hear what an insulting person has to say and will dismiss it – even if it is a good point.

Synopsis:  Communicate what you want and need without making others feel like they’ve done something wrong.

Rather than:
I hate the way you speak 100 decibels louder than necessary when you’re on the phone…It’s so annoying!


Another option:
Would you mind making your call in the other room for 30 minutes?  I’d like to finish reading/watching TV/doing sit ups and I find it hard to focus when I hear your exciting conversation with [such-and-such].
(note:  do not say this in a sarcastic and mean-spirited tone)  

Ready to learn more about how to have healthy dialogue with peers, colleagues, friends, family and all human kind?  Good for you!



let us know how it worked out…

Sincerely,
3P staff

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