Bridget Hoida on: hard beauty

Bridget is a friend, mentor, inspiration, advisor, twitter follower, confidante, et cetera…

I learned a lot about self-acceptance from Bridget’s writing advice during my years as an undgrad (and afterwards).

As it turns out, writers view words as instruments by which individuals connect to others. I learned that writing can be formatted in any way as long as the message and the spirit of the message are successfully transported to another — carrying with it the essence of its source.

Writing is a vehicle.

And, unlike perfectly formatted bullets on a memo, the musings of a good writer isn’t only concerned with getting you to point B –she wants to take you on a ride!!!

Congrats on your beautiful book, B. And, thanks for the ride.

Love,

Meg

Bridget Hoida on: hard beauty.

This will make you smarter > Defining “genius”. (Video)

I often revisit this conversation between Malcolm Gladwell and television journalist, Robert Krulwich where they discuss what defines a “genius”.

This conversation looks at the following topics and questions:

  • Is it “good” to segregate the superstars from the average stars?
  • What makes Tiger “Tiger Woods”?
  • What if it was a rule that we couldn’t ask one another from which university we graduated?
  • What is the “selection effect”?
  • Is our education system “…run like a modeling agency”?

(If you don’t have a flash player, please use this link to view the interview. Thanks for stopping by.)

3P

Caitlin Flanagan: Combating cupcake culture

National Post | Arts

By Kate Carraway

Caitlin Flanagan’s new book Girl Land posits that adolescent girls, negotiating the difficult transition from children to young women, are met with a culture that seeks to exploit and endanger them sexually. Flanagan (a contributor to The Atlantic and an often elegant writer who just as often applies a smug and wilful ignorance to established feminist arguments), writes that girls long “to be in two places at once: the safety of little girlhood, with the stuffed animals and the jump ropes and the simplicity of childhood, but also in the new place, in the arms of a lover whom she wants to ravish her, to deliver her to new shores.”

While Flanagan’s thesis might be a version of something true, and not only for 14-year-olds, her grossly prescriptive, subjective response has inspired a quick and brutal maelstrom of media ire.

View original post 637 more words

The Next Great Generation (Twitter chat)

Below is a recap of a recent Twitter Chat with TheNextGreatGeneration.com (@NextGreatGen).

Thanks, TNGG for hosting this chat regarding Gen Y and what we think about the current job market.  Below are our feedback and suggestions and the link to the original article on the TNGG’s site.

Thanks, TNGG!

3P

Link to article on TNGG

How Facebook Posts Affect Your Job Hunt (image)

Survey question:  Have you ever rejected a candidate because of what you saw about them on a social networking site?


(survey below)


Below is part of an article published on TheAtlantic.Com

What are your thoughts?






Wharton comments on "Masculine Norms" and how they affect women’s career trajectories…


I don’t understand why professional norms are classified as either “masculine” or “feminine”. Perhaps a professional norm is sufficient without the hyper-focus on gender issues which mostly create unnecessary inflammation around examples.


‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

LinkedIn Discussion: Mentors, Sponsorships, and Obsessing about the Glass Ceiling (.pdf; links)


I’m spending a lot of my time volunteering and connecting with people on LinkedIn and other websites.  I find this a rewarding use of my recent free-time (despite the extra weight I’ve gained).  Below is a recent discussion with a fellow Dress For Success volunteer on the DFS LinkedIn Group about women and mentorship.  If you have any insight, please do share.  


Thank you for visiting our blog.


3P



DFS Group-member’s response to Forbes.com article:


Corporate America only “pays” for those that have positions that are at a higher level, which to me, seems terribly unfair. We all contribute to the company’s success and since we are the right hand to the Sr. Executive that is creating the decisions, we should absolutely be mentored and have that person guide us in either how we can help them in a better way and ourselves for the future in that company. 

I CAN say I have had one or two wonderful bosses that have taken the time to mentor me the best they can, in the time small period alloted and I have asked them to. But it was not a initiative. So, I ask anyone and everyone that I work with, “What is it that I can do better, what have they done in their careers to get them where they are, etc.”

So, I would like to know how different a sponsor would be , as these people also advocated for me? Thanks so much! 



Our response to fellow DFS member:


Hi –
  I’ll look for the recent study published regarding the effects of sponsorships vs. mentorships in a professional woman’s trajectory and send it to you (or post it).**
  Unfortunately, whether anyone “pays” to facilitate these relationships or not, it’s really up to ourselves to create opportunities and become visible to the organization in which we belong.
  I, personally, have had professional mentors in my industry which happened “organically”, as well as limited experience in a mentorship formally arranged by my previous firm.  
  Obviously, there are many factors and variables that would affect the outcome of each relationship.  To me, a professional “mentor” or confidante or even an inspiring leader to observe is better than none at all.  My experience suggests that genuine bonds easily form when there is natural curiosity by the mentee, natural leadership abilities in the mentor and some common ground and chemistry between the two.  Surprisingly, some inspiration have come from those in leadership positions with whom I had very limited interaction – they led via behavior and motivation.  And, their work and character are obvious when observing their behavior and interactions with others over a long span of time.  I’ve gotten close to a few senior level professionals my industry by virtue of having worked in the same field and city for ten years.  These are informal “mentors” on whom I can rely to serve as ‘soundingboards’ for myself when I have specific questions, and they have consistently provided me with honest and good advice.  
  As with any relationship, a lot of it is trial and error.  I’ve been disappointed, betrayed and let down by professionals I’ve trusted.  No one goes to work to make ‘friends’.  
  The key is to cultivate and care for these relationships as they are precious [I still struggle with effectively demonstrating this].  It’s quite generous for others to take time to provide you with insight it has taken them years of experience to acquire.  Their time shouldn’t be taken lightly.  Furthermore, it helps when you’re naturally inquisitive about the person as opposed to framing the question as a request for specific steps to take to reach the top.  I find there is no answer to the question, “how can I reach the stars?”.  To each their own.  However, regular conversations with a trust professional in your field (not working in your office, preferably) can provide you with an extra set of eyes to your specific situation, thus allowing you to have a wider perspective before making big career decisions.
  I’m naturally curious about people.  I love reading biographies.  And, I’m the same when I meet people who I find fascinating – whether their “higher up the chain” or nowhere near a chain.


I read an excellent quote yesterday paraphrasing Cornell West’s comment.  I like it because it reminds me not to lose sight of the bigger things in life and who besides ourselves to consider:


Stop obsessing over only the glass ceiling & remember people in the basement & on the seventh floor.
(- Cornell West)

Catalyst Study Shows Sponsorship is Key to Women’s Success

NEW YORK (August 17, 2011)—For women especially, it takes more than meeting expectations to get noticed in today’s workplace. Female employees who work hard and play by the rules are often overlooked when it comes to plum assignments and big promotions. According to Sponsoring Women to Success, the latest in Catalyst’s groundbreaking series of reports on women and sponsorship, effective sponsorship is critical to accelerating a woman’s career—from getting her noticed by senior-level executives to being considered for her company’s top jobs.
Key findings of this report include:
Sponsorship matters, especially to women. “Good sponsors can supercharge a woman’s career by providing her with access to essential networks, bringing her achievements to the attention of senior-level executives, and recommending her for key assignments,” said Ilene H. Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst. “Effective sponsors also provide career coaching and guidance that enable protégés to make broader and more strategic contributions to their organizations.”
Previous research shows that women can be penalized for exhibiting self-promoting behavior considered acceptable in men but unappealing in women. Because good sponsors recognize and reward talented employees by speaking up on their behalf, sponsorship can help high-performing female employees subvert this double bind.
Sponsorship benefits sponsors, protégés and organizations. A protégé’s career is clearly enhanced by a good relationship with a sponsor. But sponsors benefit too—by establishing reputations as discerning leaders invested in talent sustainability, as powerful contributors to their organization’s success, by learning from employees at every level, and gaining leadership skills that can further enhance their own careers. Sponsors also reported a sense of satisfaction from actively supporting the careers of their most promising employees. Sponsorship benefits companies by creating more effective and committed teams and fostering a “pay it forward” mentality that makes employees feel valued and supported.
Senior-level executives must recognize sponsorship as a necessary component of good leadership. Executives should understand what good sponsorship entails and how to use their influence to advance high-performing employees’ careers, be vocal advocates for their protégés, and build a foundation of support that will ensure their protégés’ continued success in the organization. Executives can become sponsors by paying attention to high-performing employees at all levels of an organization, including those who may often go unnoticed.
There is no “silver bullet” for attracting the attention of a high-level sponsor. Sponsoring Women to Success reveals that sponsorship is earned. To attract sponsors, employees need to make their skills, strengths, and work known to colleagues as well as senior leaders. They must build reputations as flexible, collegial professionals who are consistently committed to their own career development.
Smart companies create environments where sponsorship thrives. Companies must explicitly and transparently communicate an expectation of sponsorship to their executives. “At Catalyst, we believe that sponsorship is something good leaders do,” noted Ms. Lang. “Companies that educate their employees about sponsorship, link it to talent management systems, and make it a hallmark of organizational strategy will reap tremendous rewards.”
Successful sponsorship is a win/win/win. Everyone wins when employees make their talents visible to executives, when executives truly invest in high-performing talent, and when companies foster an expectation and an environment in which sponsorship can flourish:
  • High-performing employees, particularly women, gain critical, career-accelerating experiences and advancement opportunities.
  • Sponsors receive valuable feedback from protégés and build reputational capital as leaders committed to building a robust pipeline of talent.
  • Organizations increase employee engagement, retention, talent development and the strength of the talent pipeline.
A companion tool to this report, Fostering Sponsorship Success Among High Performers and Leaders, offers additional information on how high-performing employees can attract sponsorship, and how senior leaders can become effective sponsors.
American Express Company and Deloitte LLP were the Executive Circle Sponsors of Sponsoring Women to Success.
ABOUT CATALYST
Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization expanding opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and more than 400 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Catalyst annually honors exemplary organizational initiatives that promote women’s advancement with the Catalyst Award.”

Additional References & Resources:
Link to:  Do You Have A Mentor/Sponsor? discussion on Linked In.
Link to:  Forbes article
Link to:  Catalyst published study:  effects of mentorship vs. sponsorship **
Link to:  Resources for Leadership article
Link to:  Center for Creative Leadership 


source:  http://www.catalyst.org/press-release/190/catalyst-study-shows-sponsorship-is-key-to-womens-success

‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

I don’t understand why professional norms are classified as either “masculine” or “feminine”. Perhaps a professional norm is sufficient without the hyper-focus on gender issues which mostly create unnecessary inflammation around examples.


‘Masculine Norms’: Why Working Women Find It Hard to Reach the Top – Knowledge@Wharton

Article: Young and Underemployed (Forbes.com)

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert


Your comment was called out!

On this post: Young And Underemployed: The Lasting Effects Of The Lost Generation

 Undergraduate education is not technical school. Some of us attend school because we value a well-rounded education, not to secure employment after graduation. Educational background (undergraduate) are less relevant than internships, volunteer experience and on-campus activities. There’s a distinction between going to a trade school and attending a university.

Link to article 

Employees Can’t Be Fired for Facebook Complaints, Judge Says – Forbes

"Fallen Princesses" by Dina Goldstein

Amazing work by Dina Goldstein, “Fallen Princesses” examines the untold story of princesses lives after the happily ever-after.

These works place Fairy Tale characters in modern day scenarios. In all of the images the Princess is placed in an environment that articulates her conflict. The ‘…happily ever after’ is replaced with a realistic outcome and addresses current issues… Disney’s perfect Princesses [are] juxtaposed with real issues that were affecting women around me, such as illness, addiction and self-image issues.

Famous photographer, Annie Leibovitz, is also credited for her beautiful work photographing celebrities as Disney Princesses.  Let’s examine the different messages their images convey:

Snow White courtesy of Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz (Rachel Weisz)

Ariel by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz 

Cinderella by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

What an impactful way to reveal the “other side” of the sought-after-fairy-tale-lives we imagined as girls.   I am a girly-girl, however, it’s important to have a reality check once-in-a-while.

Dina Goldstein’s photographs serve just that purpose – and well.  What a force to counteract the ever-so-influential princess cartoons children are exposed to.

Belle by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)
by Annie Leibovitz (Penelope Cruz as Belle)

Pocahontas by Dina Goldstein (Fallen Princesses)

by Annie Leibovitz (Jessica Biel as Pocahontas)
The Disney Princesses

Do well in school, young ladies!!!

3P

The Bias against "Creativity" (Forbes)

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


From: Forbes
Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2011 08:05:36 -0400
To: prettypinkponies
ReplyTo: Forbes
Subject: Your comment was called out

Forbes   Called-Out Comment Alert


Your comment was called out!

On this post: Managing The Psychological Bias Against Creativity

If the major deterrent to accepting “creative thinking” in the workplace is low tolerance for uncertainty, I would surmise that highly-regulated and high-risk industries have don’t evolve as quickly as others due to lack of innovation (“creativity”). Do you have any thoughts about the relationship between  regulation and innovation? Thank you for posting this article. Much appreciated. 3P


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Your Seat @ NY Fashion Week! (videos)

As you may already know, NY Fashion Week begins this Wednesday, Sept. 7th.  What will you wear???

If you’d like some refreshing inspiration for your own Fall 2011 wardrobe, it’d be a good idea to watch the big-name designers’ shows.  However,  if you’re much too busy to make it to NYC to watch in person, below are the links and schedules of individual shows which will be available for you to view on YOUTUBE:


Thursday, Sept. 8, 9 a.m. ET



Thursday, Sept. 8, 10 a.m. ET



Thursday, Sept. 8, 11 a.m. ET



Thursday, Sept. 8, 1 p.m. ET



Thursday, Sept. 8, 2 p.m. ET



Friday, Sept. 9, 11 a.m. ET


Friday, Sept. 9, 2 p.m. ET



Friday, Sept. 9, 6 p.m. ET



Friday, Sept. 9, 7 p.m. ET



Saturday, Sept. 10, 10 a.m. ET



Saturday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m. ET



Saturday, Sept. 10, 3 p.m. ET



Saturday, Sept. 10, 6 p.m. ET



Saturday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m. ET



Sunday, Sept. 11, 12 p.m. ET



Sunday, Sept. 11, 1 p.m. ET



Sunday, Sept. 11, 2 p.m. ET



Sunday, Sept. 11, 4 p.m. ET



Sunday, Sept. 11, 7 p.m. ET



Sunday, Sept. 11, 8 p.m. ET



Monday, Sept. 12, 10 a.m. ET



Monday, Sept. 12, 11 a.m. ET



Monday, Sept. 12, 1 p.m. ET



Monday, Sept. 12, 2 p.m. ET



Monday, Sept. 12, 6 p.m. ET



Monday, Sept. 12, 7 p.m. ET



Tuesday, Sept. 13, 10 a.m. ET



Tuesday, Sept. 13, 11 a.m. ET



Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2 p.m. ET



Tuesday, Sept. 13, 6 p.m. ET



Tuesday, Sept.13, 7 p.m. ET



Tuesday, Sept. 13, 8 p.m. ET



Wednesday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m. ET



Wednesday, Sept. 14, 3 p.m. ET



Wednesday, Sept. 14, 6 p.m. ET



Wednesday, Sept. 14, 7 p.m. ET



Thursday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. ET

VIP seats for yourself and anyone else you can fit on your couch.  Cheers!

Louboutin may lose Red Sole Trademark!?! (article)

Wow.

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry 8/10/2011


Subject: Louboutin May Lose Red Sole Trademark After Judge Denies Injunction Against Yves Saint Laurent

fashionologie
Louboutin May Lose Red Sole Trademark After Judge Denies Injunction Against Yves Saint Laurent
>> While it remains to be seen whether Christian Louboutin will retain its red-sole trademark, a Manhattan …